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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Cedartown in Polk County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Big Spring Park

 
 
Big Spring Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 4, 2010
1. Big Spring Park Marker
Inscription. Asa Prior, born in Virginia about 1785, pioneered into this valley and purchased a large tract of land including this spring and Cedar Creek in 1834. In 1852 he deeded the spring and 10 adjacent acres to the City of Cedartown. Another pioneer, Mr. Walthall, established the Walthall Indian Trading Post near the spring. Peace-loving Cherokees gathered here. Indian young people danced their corn dance under the cedar trees. The Cedar Valley Garden Club beautified this park. A shrine was dedicated to the memory of Sen. William Julius Harris, whose funeral was held in the park, April 21, 1932.
 
Erected 1956 by Georgia Department of Natural Resources. (Marker Number 115-6.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 34° 0.876′ N, 85° 15.482′ W. Marker is in Cedartown, Georgia, in Polk County. Marker is at the intersection of Wissahickon Avenue and Essex Avenue, on the right when traveling east on Wissahickon Avenue. Touch for map. Big Spring Park is now part of the Cedartown Water Works. Marker is in this post office area: Cedartown GA 30125, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 7 other markers are within 13 miles of this marker, measured as
Big Spring Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 4, 2010
2. Big Spring Park Marker
the crow flies. Ivy Ledbetter Lee (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Polk County (approx. 0.2 miles away); Sterling Holloway (approx. 0.2 miles away); Georgia School for the Deaf (approx. 7.8 miles away); Davis & Dodge at Peekís Spring (approx. 11.5 miles away); Loganís 15th Corps at Swaintown (approx. 11.8 miles away); Medora Field Perkerson (approx. 13 miles away).
 
Categories. Native AmericansSettlements & Settlers
 
Big Spring Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 4, 2010
3. Big Spring Park Marker
Looking west on Wissahickon Avenue, with the park (and marker) on the left
Big Spring Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 4, 2010
4. Big Spring Park Marker
The Cedartown Water Works Woman's Building, with the marker just visible on the right.
Cedartown Water Works image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 4, 2010
5. Cedartown Water Works
The Woman's Building, in the Big Spring Park Historic District, was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2000.
Cedartown Water Works image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 4, 2010
6. Cedartown Water Works
The marker, and entrance to the park, are on the right.
Sign at Big Spring in Park image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 4, 2010
7. Sign at Big Spring in Park
The sign cautions potential swimmers that "Snakes are naturally in spring area."
SIgn in Window of Water Works Woman's Building image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 4, 2010
8. SIgn in Window of Water Works Woman's Building
Message in a Bottle #2 Water, water everywhere, and not a drop to drink. It springs forth from underground, And ends up in your sink. Purity is cherished here, Or the whole town gets sickened. Can you believe I found a word that rhymes with Wissahickon? (The marker, park, and Water Works are on Wissahickon Avenue)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 16, 2010, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 659 times since then and 22 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on September 16, 2010, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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