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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Cranbury in Middlesex County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Cranberry Mills

 
 
Cranberry Mills Marker image. Click for full size.
By Deb Hartshorn, September 22, 2010
1. Cranberry Mills Marker
Inscription. This gristmill stone commemorates Cranberry Mills, the first industry in Cranbury - erected by Thomas Grubbs in 1737, on the south side of Cranbury Brook. The village, was once called Cranberry or Cranberry Town, changed its name to Cranbury late in the 19th century. The gristmill formed the nucleus for the development of the Village of Cranbury, drawing settlers, post houses, inns, churches and small businesses related to farming. A dam for waterpower was built, creating a roadway over the brook and creating a small lake, Brainerd Lake, so called in honor of the 18th century missionary, David Brainerd. The dam, roadway and gristmill were constructed at the intersection of two major Indian trails, one from South Amboy and one from New Brunswick.
In 1840, a water-powered sawmill was erected next to the gristmill but both were destroyed by fire, rebuilt and razed again by fire. After an 1860 blaze, the gristmill was rebuilt and a miller's house was erected south of the mill, at 6 South Main Street. Serving as Cranbury's Police Station from 1968 to 1985, the miller's house is now maintained by the Cranbury Historical and Preservation Society as the Cranbury History Center. In 1939, the inactive gristmill was demolished and the area was named Memorial Park, dedicated in 1949 to Cranbury Veterans of World War I and subsequent wars.
This
Cranberry Mills Marker and gristmill stone image. Click for full size.
By Deb Hartshorn, September 22, 2010
2. Cranberry Mills Marker and gristmill stone
Historic Marker is a gift to the people of Cranbury from the Middlesex County Board of Chosen Freeholders, 2009.
 
Erected 2009 by Middlesex County Board of Chosen Freeholders.
 
Location. 40° 18.541′ N, 74° 31.019′ W. Marker is in Cranbury, New Jersey, in Middlesex County. Marker is at the intersection of South Main Street and Evans Drive, on the right when traveling south on South Main Street. Touch for map. Located at the Cranbury History Center. Marker is at or near this postal address: 6 South Main Street, Cranbury NJ 08512, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Site of Encampment (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Cranbury Dam (about 300 feet away); The First Presbyterian Church and Cemetery (about 500 feet away); Site of House of Dr. Hezekiah Stites (approx. 0.3 miles away); Todd Beamer (approx. 0.3 miles away); Parsonage Barn (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Second Presbyterian Church of Cranbury (approx. 0.4 miles away); Hightstown (approx. 2.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Cranbury.
 
Categories. Colonial EraIndustry & Commerce
 
Front of Gristmiller's House image. Click for full size.
By Deb Hartshorn, September 22, 2010
3. Front of Gristmiller's House
Location of the Cranbury History Center
North view of Gristmiller's House, Cranberry Mills Marker, and gristmill stone image. Click for full size.
By Deb Hartshorn, September 22, 2010
4. North view of Gristmiller's House, Cranberry Mills Marker, and gristmill stone
Rear view of Gristmiller's House and outhouse image. Click for full size.
By Deb Hartshorn, September 22, 2010
5. Rear view of Gristmiller's House and outhouse
The outhouse was moved from a private residence at 67 North Main Street
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 23, 2010, by Deb Hartshorn of Burlington County, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 536 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 23, 2010, by Deb Hartshorn of Burlington County, New Jersey.   4, 5. submitted on September 24, 2010, by Deb Hartshorn of Burlington County, New Jersey. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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