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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Montgomery in Montgomery County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

First Baptist Church (Brick-A-Day Church)

 
 
First Baptist Church (Brick-A-Day Church) Marker image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, October 1, 2010
1. First Baptist Church (Brick-A-Day Church) Marker
Inscription. Organized in 1866, this pioneering congregation grew out of First Baptist Church, now on Perry Street, where early parishioners had worshipped as slaves. The first building, facing Columbus Street, was erected in 1867. Nathan Ashby served as first pastor (1866-70) to over 700 members and as first president of the Colored Baptist Convention of Alabama, now known as the Alabama Baptist State Convention, which was organized here in 1868. The Baptist Foreign Mission Convention, later part of the National Baptist Convention, USA, Inc., was organized here in 1880. First Baptist hosted the first baccalaureate service for State Normal School, now Alabama State University, in 1890. Third pastor Dr. Andrew Jackson Stokes (1892-1924) organized the Montgomery Baptist Institute.
After fire destroyed the first frame church, Stokes led a
(Continued on other side)

(Continued from other side)
rebuilding effort from 1910-1915. This Romanesque Revival style building was designed by architect W.T. Bailey of Tuskegee Institute and built largely of bricks donated by members, earning the name "Brick-A-Day Church." In 1916, membership was estimated over 5,000, making it the largest black Baptist congregation in America. This historic church is remembered for its role in the civil rights movement during the pastorate of Rev. Ralph
First Baptist Church (Brick-A-Day Church) Marker image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, October 1, 2010
2. First Baptist Church (Brick-A-Day Church) Marker
D. Abernathy (1952-1961). On January 10, 1957, the church and its parsonage were bombed. Later that year it hosted the first Institute on Non-Violence and Social Change sponsored by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. In 1961, Freedom Riders, church members, and others were held captive inside for 15 hours by an angry mob. U.S. Attorney General Robert Kennedy federalized the Alabama National Guard to ensure their safe exit the next morning.
 
Erected by Alabama Historical Commission.
 
Location. 32° 22.918′ N, 86° 17.909′ W. Marker is in Montgomery, Alabama, in Montgomery County. Marker is at the intersection of North Ripley Street and Columbus Street, on the left when traveling north on North Ripley Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Montgomery AL 36104, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Old Oakwood Cemetery (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Brigadier General Birkett Davenport Fry, CSA / Colonel B.D. Fry at Battle of Gettysburg (approx. 0.2 miles away); Civil War Medicine / Montgomery's Confederate Hospitals (approx. 0.2 miles away); Ray W. Scott Jr. Founded Bass Anglers Movement
First Baptist Church (Brick-A-Day Church) image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, October 1, 2010
3. First Baptist Church (Brick-A-Day Church)
Marker is on the right in this view, taken from the South side of the church.
(approx. mile away); Camellia Designated Alabama State Flower (approx. mile away); Alabama War Veterans Monument (approx. mile away); Civil War Laurel Oak Tree (approx. mile away); Second National Confederate Flag (approx. mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Montgomery.
 
Categories. African AmericansChurches, Etc.Civil Rights
 
First Baptist Church (Brick-A-Day Church) image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, October 1, 2010
4. First Baptist Church (Brick-A-Day Church)
stained glass windows
First Baptist Church image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, October 1, 2010
5. First Baptist Church
Located on Perry Street as stated on this marker. Church is on the southeast corner of South Perry Street and Adams Avenue.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 4, 2010, by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama. This page has been viewed 1,375 times since then and 43 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 4, 2010, by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama.   5. submitted on October 5, 2010, by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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