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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Swampscott in Essex County, Massachusetts — The American Northeast (New England)
 

In Memory of G. Norman Albree

 
 
In Memory of G. Norman Albree Monument image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, September 27, 2010
1. In Memory of G. Norman Albree Monument
Inscription.
In Memory Of
Native Son
G. Norman Albree
And All
Early Bird Pilots
Who Dared To Soar

 
Location. 42° 28.055′ N, 70° 54.647′ W. Marker is in Swampscott, Massachusetts, in Essex County. Marker is at the intersection of Humphrey Street (Massachusetts Route 129) and Greenwood Avenue, on the left when traveling south on Humphrey Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Swampscott MA 01907, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Swampscott Mariners Memorial (a few steps from this marker); Captured English Cannon (a few steps from this marker); Lt. Gen. John R. Chaisson (within shouting distance of this marker); Judge Andrew R. Linscott (approx. 0.4 miles away); Swampscott World War Honor Roll (approx. 0.4 miles away); Swampscott Vietnam Veterans Honor Roll (approx. 0.4 miles away); Swampscott Desert Shield - Desert Storm Monument (approx. 0.4 miles away); Swampscott Revolutionary War Honor Roll (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Swampscott.
 
Regarding In Memory of G. Norman Albree.
George N. Albree designed the Pigeon-Fraser Scout, also known as Albree Monoplane, the first dedicated pursuit airplane
In Memory of G. Norman Albree Monument image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, September 27, 2010
2. In Memory of G. Norman Albree Monument
contracted for by the United States Government. It was manufactured by the Pigeon Hollow Spar Company of East Boston. Notable design features included a flat bottomed airfoil and an all moving tail. Instead of a hinged the elevator, the entire aft fuselage was hinged alowing it to deflect up and down to control pitch. The first aircraft was a structural test article that was tested to destruction. The second is said to have crashed and burned on it's maiden flight in December 1917, killing the pilot. The third and only remaining aircraft is on display at the Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome, Rhinebeck, NY. It was considered "too old-fashioned, unreliable, and slow" at the time and was shelved.
 
Also see . . .  The Pigeon-Fraser at Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome. (Submitted on October 7, 2010, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
 
Categories. Air & Space
 
In Memory of G. Norman Albree Monument image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, September 27, 2010
3. In Memory of G. Norman Albree Monument
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 7, 2010, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 924 times since then and 75 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 7, 2010, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.
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