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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Walloomsac in Rensselaer County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

“the first link in the chain of successes which issued in the surrender at Saratoga ...”

East

 
 
First Link Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 9, 2010
1. First Link Marker
Inscription.
The River Crossing
Travelers on the road to Bennington in 1777 crossed the Walloomsac River on a bridge where today’s bridge stands at the foot of this hill. To defend this important crossing, Baum placed his Brunswick grenadiers and a few British marksmen in a small breastwork overlooking the bridge and posted his Canadian troops in houses near the river.

Stark’s Camp
General John Stark, aware that enemy troops were approaching Bennington in force, encamped his small army three miles east of this hill, just beyond a bend in the Walloomsac River. On August 16, he set in motion his plan to dislodge Baum’s entrenched forces. Stark would send 100 militiamen marching into view 100 yards from the bridge as a diversion. Meanwhile, two columns led by Colonels Moses Nichols and Samuel Herrick would skirt either side of the hill and approach from the rear. Two smaller columns under Colonels David Hobart and Thomas Stickney would assault the “Tory redoubt” located on a rise of ground across the river. The remaining troops would assault the small breastworks guarding the river crossing and then charge up the south and east slopes of the hill. Stark’s plan was a success. The outposts fell swiftly, and Baum’s main position atop the hill was surrounded.

The Bennington Monument
This obelisk,
Bennington Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 9, 2010
2. Bennington Marker
located in Bennington, Vermont, marks the site of the American storehouses which Baum had hoped to capture. It is 306 feet high and was completed in 1889.

The Tory Redoubt
A small hill on the opposite side of the Walloomsac River was fortified by a contingent of American loyalists, or Tories, many of whom were neighbors of Stark’s militiamen. Colonels David Hobart and Thomas Stickney led 300 New Hampshire troops against this “Tory redoubt.” To distinguish friend from foe, the attackers reportedly wore cornhusks in their hats. The Tories, expecting no mercy from those who considered them traitors, fired one volley at the New Hampshire men and fled.
 
Erected by Bennington Battlefield State Historic Site.
 
Location. 42° 56.307′ N, 73° 18.255′ W. Marker is in Walloomsac, New York, in Rensselaer County. Marker can be reached from New York State Route 67, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is located in Bennington Battlefield State Historic Site. Marker is in this post office area: Hoosick Falls NY 12090, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Bennington Battle Field (here, next to this marker); A Gathering Storm (here, next to this marker); “Had day lasted an hour longer . . .”
Markers on the Bennington Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 9, 2010
3. Markers on the Bennington Battlefield
Several markers are found at this location. The First Link marker is seen here on the left.
(here, next to this marker); Bennington Battlefield (a few steps from this marker); Patriots of Vermont (a few steps from this marker); New Hampshire Troops (within shouting distance of this marker); Massachusetts Volunteers at Bennington (within shouting distance of this marker); New Hampshire Regiment (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Walloomsac.
 
More about this marker. A drawing of British troops building emplacements appears in the center of the marker. It has a caption of “Baum . . . extended his front too much and thus weaken’d the whole; he had an English engineer with him Lieut. Durnford who very judiciously threw up his works on the side of the hill . . . ” John Hadden, with Burgoyne, 1777.
Next to this is a map showing the positions of American and British troops near Bennington, Vermont on August 16, 1777. Also on the marker are maps of the River Crossing and the location of the Tory Redoubt, as well as pictures of the Bennington Monument and an equestrian statue of Gen. John Stark.
 
Also see . . .
Bennington Battlefield State Historic Site image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 9, 2010
4. Bennington Battlefield State Historic Site
The marker (seen at the center) is located at the crest of the hill where Col. Baum had placed his troops and were attacked by the Americans.

1. Bennington Battlefield State Historic Site. New York State Office of Parks, Recreation & Historic Preservation website. (Submitted on October 10, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. The Battle of Bennington. The American Revolutionary War website. (Submitted on October 10, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

3. The Battle of Bennington 1777. An account of the Battle of Bennington from a British perspective from BritishBattles.com. (Submitted on October 10, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 10, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 684 times since then and 22 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 10, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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