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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Columbus in Colorado County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Alleyton C.S.A.

 
 
Alleyton C.S.A. Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tiffany Prentice, October 4, 2010
1. Alleyton C.S.A. Marker
Inscription. Born as war clouds gathered, Alleyton was a key point on the supply line of the Confederate States of America during the Civil War. It was both beginning and end of the cotton road leading to the Confederacy's back door on the Rio Grande River.

By 1860 the Buffalo Bayou, Brazos and Colorado Railroad extended from Harrisburg, near Houston, to Alleyton. As a railhead Alleyton became the site of an important cotton station and Quartermaster Depot during the War.

Cotton came here from north and east Texas, from Louisiana, and from Arkansas on the rails of the B.B.B. & C. and via wagon roads. From Alleyton the South's most precious trading commodity was carried to a point on the Colorado River across from Columbus. It was then ferried across for the start of a long, tortuous journey to the Rio Grande. The bales of cotton were hauled on big-bedded wagons and high-wheeled Mexican carts, pulled by mules, horses or oxen.

The Cotton Road led to Goliad, San Patricio, the King Ranch and finally to Brownsville. Shreds of white fluff on bush and cactus marked the trail of the wagon trains. From Brownsville the cotton was taken across the river to Matamoros, Mexico and subsequently placed on board ships bound for Europe. As the only major gap in the Federal naval blockade of the Confederacy, neutral Matamoros was the
Alleyton C.S.A. Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, January 2, 2014
2. Alleyton C.S.A. Marker
Additional close-up of whole marker
place of exchange for outgoing cotton and imported munitions, clothing and medicine.

When Federal forces took Vicksburg in 1863 the Mississippi River was sealed off and the Confederacy divided. The Texas-Mexico trade routes became the South's major military supply lines in the trans-Mississippi west.

Alleyton was a main destination of the wagon trains returning from the Rio Grande. Rifles, swords, shirts, pants, alum, arrowroot and other items needed by soldier and civilian in the harried Confederacy were unloaded here for new destinations.

A memorial to Texans who served the Confederacy
 
Erected 1963. (Marker Number 130.)
 
Location. 29° 42.593′ N, 96° 28.872′ W. Marker is in Columbus, Texas, in Colorado County. Marker is at the intersection of Farm to Market Road 102 and Alleytown Road (County Road 268), on the right when traveling south on Road 102. Touch for map. About 2/10 mile south of US Interstate Highway 10 about four miles east of Columbus. Marker is in this post office area: Columbus TX 78934, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Beason's (Beeson's) Crossing (approx. 3.3 miles away); Benjamin Beason's Crossing (approx. 3.3
Yet another picture of the marker Alleyton C.S.A. Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, September 1, 2014
3. Yet another picture of the marker Alleyton C.S.A. Marker
miles away); Columbus Waterworks (approx. 3.4 miles away); Stage Lines Through Columbus (approx. 3 miles away); Early Site of Doctor Logue's Drugstore (approx. 3 miles away); District Court Tree (approx. 3 miles away); The Columbus Tap Railway (approx. 3 miles away); 1890 Cornerstone Ceremony (approx. 3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Columbus.
 
Categories. Railroads & StreetcarsWar, US Civil
 
Alleyton C.S.A. Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, January 2, 2014
4. Alleyton C.S.A. Marker
View of marker in context. I-10 in the distance.
Wide View of Alleyton C.S.A. Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, September 1, 2014
5. Wide View of Alleyton C.S.A. Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 12, 2010, by Tiffany Prentice of Houston, Texas. This page has been viewed 767 times since then and 66 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on October 12, 2010, by Tiffany Prentice of Houston, Texas.   2. submitted on January 3, 2014, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.   3. submitted on September 2, 2014, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.   4. submitted on January 3, 2014, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.   5. submitted on September 2, 2014, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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