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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Torrington in Litchfield County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

World’s First Condensed Milk Factory

 
 
World's First Condensed Milk Factory Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, October 22, 2010
1. World's First Condensed Milk Factory Marker
Inscription.
Site of The
World's First
Condensed Milk Factory
Established By
Gail Borden

 
Location. Marker is missing. It was located near 41° 52.32′ N, 73° 5.403′ W. Marker was in Torrington, Connecticut, in Litchfield County. Marker was on Burr Mountain Road half a mile west of Winsted Road, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker was in this post office area: Torrington CT 06790, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this location, measured as the crow flies. To Honor The Men Of Camp Wolcott (approx. 0.2 miles away); Non-Repatriated Soldiers' Monument (approx. 3˝ miles away); Winchester World War I Memorial (approx. 3˝ miles away); Winchester VFW Monument (approx. 3.6 miles away); World War II Living Memorial (approx. 3.6 miles away); Winchester (approx. 3.7 miles away); Winchester Soldiers' Memorial (approx. 3.7 miles away); a different marker also named Winchester Soldiers Memorial (approx. 3.7 miles away).
 
More about this marker. Numerous web sites refer to a bronze plaque marking this site. The photos show a boulder with a chisled, flat surface facing the road. But the plaque is missing.
 
Regarding World’s First Condensed Milk Factory.
Foundation Ruins at the Factory Site image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, October 22, 2010
2. Foundation Ruins at the Factory Site
[ from the Connecticut DEP Burr Pond State Park website ]
Gail Borden, discoverer of the process of milk preservation by evaporation and condensation, built the world's first condensed milk factory here, in 1857. The new milk product proved to be of great value, particularly to the Union Army during the Civil War. Fire destroyed the mill in 1877. A bronze tablet marks its site, just below the falls.
 
Also see . . .  Gail Borden on Wikipedia. (Submitted on October 28, 2010, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
 
Categories. Industry & Commerce
 
Foundation Ruins at the Factory Site image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, October 22, 2010
3. Foundation Ruins at the Factory Site
Missing Plaque Was Attached to This Boulder image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, October 22, 2010
4. Missing Plaque Was Attached to This Boulder
The boulder is next to the foundation ruins. In the background is the stream and falls which supplied water to the factory.
Missing Plaque Was Attached to This Boulder image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, October 22, 2010
5. Missing Plaque Was Attached to This Boulder
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 28, 2010, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 1,512 times since then and 182 times this year. This page was the Marker of the Week October 31, 2010. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on October 28, 2010, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Photo and/or text of the missing plaque • Can you help?
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