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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Elberton in Elbert County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Coldwater Methodist Church

 
 
Coldwater Methodist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, October 11, 2010
1. Coldwater Methodist Church Marker
Inscription.
In the late 1770ís, a large caravan of Virginians, including a Methodist preacher, traveling south in search of a new home, settled in this neighborhood. In the company were the Adams, Alexander, Banks, Cunningham, Fleming, Anderson, Gaines, Johnson, Teasley, Tyner, Stower and Brown families. At once they built a place of worship with loopholes for defense against Indians. In this “Meeting House,” Bishop Francis Asbury, leader of early American Methodism, preached from time to time. His remark -- “This is indeed cold water.” -- after drinking from the nearby spring gave the church its name.

The second house of worship was of lumber sawed on Coldwater Creek by Ralph Gaines. The three Adams brothers -- Hiram, James, and Lawrence -- joined him in erecting the building. Destroyed by fire in 1883, it was replaced by an exceptionally beautiful rural church. The fourth building, started in 1947, was dedicated August 29, 1947 by Rev. Horace Smith, District Superintendent.

Of ten memorial windows in this church, two are dedicated to Howell Gaines Adams and Nick Drewry Carpenter, who fell in battle in World War II.
 
Erected 1957 by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker Number 052--10.)
 
Marker series.
Coldwater Methodist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 16, 2014
2. Coldwater Methodist Church Marker
This marker is included in the Francis Asbury, Traveling Methodist Preacher, and the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 34° 13.794′ N, 82° 50.484′ W. Marker is near Elberton, Georgia, in Elbert County. Marker is on Coldwater Creek Road half a mile west of Double Bridges Road, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. The church is located southeast of the community of Nuberg. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2142 Coldwater Creek Road, Elberton GA 30635, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Georgia Guidestones (approx. 3 miles away); Vanís Creek Baptist Church (approx. 5.3 miles away); Navy Seabees Can Do (approx. 7.5 miles away); Memorial Park History (approx. 7.5 miles away); In Memoriam (approx. 7.5 miles away); Elbert County's Dead in the Civil War (approx. 7.5 miles away); Soldier (approx. 7.5 miles away); My American Soldier (approx. 7.5 miles away); Battle of Cherokee Ford (approx. 7.5 miles away); Revolutionary War Soldiers (approx. 7.5 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Elberton.
 
Also see . . .  Francis Asbury. Francis Asbury (August 20, 1745 – March 31, 1816) was one of the first two bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church in the United States. As a young
Coldwater Methodist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, October 11, 2010
3. Coldwater Methodist Church Marker
The marker has been moved from its original concrete/rebar pole to this metal post
man in October 1771, the Englishman traveled to America and, during his 45 years there, he devoted his life to ministry, traveling on horseback and by carriage thousands of miles to those living on the frontier. (Submitted on October 30, 2014, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.Settlements & SettlersWar, World II
 
Coldwater Methodist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, October 11, 2010
4. Coldwater Methodist Church Marker
Looking southeast, with Coldwater Creek Road in the distance
Coldwater Methodist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 16, 2014
5. Coldwater Methodist Church Marker
Coldwater Methodist Church and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 16, 2014
6. Coldwater Methodist Church and Marker
Coldwater Methodist Church image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, October 11, 2010
7. Coldwater Methodist Church
The church building was built in 1947.
Coldwater Methodist Church image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 16, 2014
8. Coldwater Methodist Church
Grave of Ralph Banks image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, October 11, 2010
9. Grave of Ralph Banks
Ralph Banks, one of the original settlers and founders of Coldwater Methodist Church, is buried near the church building.
Grave of Ralph Banks image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, October 11, 2010
10. Grave of Ralph Banks
Ralph Banks was a vereran of the American Revolution, and his grave was marked by the Daughters of the American Revolution in 1969.
Banks Family Plot<br>Founding Members of Coldwater Methodist Church image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 16, 2014
11. Banks Family Plot
Founding Members of Coldwater Methodist Church
Banks Family Monument image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 16, 2014
12. Banks Family Monument
Banks Family Monument image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 16, 2014
13. Banks Family Monument
Banks Family Monument image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 16, 2014
14. Banks Family Monument
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 29, 2010, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 1,031 times since then and 36 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on October 29, 2010, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   2. submitted on October 30, 2014, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3, 4. submitted on October 29, 2010, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   5, 6. submitted on October 30, 2014, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   7. submitted on October 29, 2010, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   8. submitted on October 30, 2014, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   9, 10. submitted on October 29, 2010, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   11, 12, 13, 14. submitted on October 30, 2014, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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