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Kinderhook in Columbia County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Welcome to Lindenwald

Martin Van Buren Nat’l Hist Site

 

—National Park Service —

 
Welcome to Lindenwald Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 1, 2010
1. Welcome to Lindenwald Marker
Inscription. Welcome to Martin Van Buren National Historic Site. “Lindenwald” was the home and farm of the nation’s eighth president. Martin Van Buren’s life bridged the 80 years between the American War for Independence and the U.S. Civil War, the formative years of the American Republic. He was among the most prominent politicians of his time and an architect of the party system that still shapes American political life.

Politics before the Civil War was a whirlwind of boisterous characters and opposing interest groups. Martin Van Buren positioned himself in the eye of the political storm and in the process helped to found the Democratic Party. He continued to be a central figure in American politics after coming to Lindenwald in 1841. He ran for the presidency twice more from this house.

To learn more about the rough and tumble of American politics when the country was very young as well as the beautiful farmland which is preserved around Lindenwald, please cross Old Post Road to the visitor center to speak with a park ranger about visiting President Van Buren’s home and other activities. House tours are scheduled throughout the day during the visitor season.

Since 1997 the National Park Service has worked with the Open Space Institute (OSI) and other partners to protect President Van Buren’s Lindenwald farm and
Welcome to Lindenwald Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 1, 2010
2. Welcome to Lindenwald Marker
other land along Kinderhook Creek having historic, agricultural, scenic and recreational value. To date OSI has protected more than 700 acres along Kinderhook Creek, including 125 acres that were originally part of Lindenwald. The surroundings and vistas of Lindenwald appear much as they did when Martin Van Buren lived here, an aesthetically pleasing resource intimately and tangibly related to his life.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Location. 42° 22.234′ N, 73° 42.11′ W. Marker is in Kinderhook, New York, in Columbia County. Marker is on Old Post Road, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is located in the parking lot on the grounds of the Martin Van Buren National Historic Site. Marker is in this post office area: Kinderhook NY 12106, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Uncovering the Past (within shouting distance of this marker); Lindenwald and the Old Post Road (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Fertile Political Ground (about 500 feet away); 1849-50     A House Transformed (about 600 feet away); A Bustling Household (about 600 feet away); Marble Mounting Block
Marker at the Martin Van Buren Nat’l Hist Site image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 1, 2010
3. Marker at the Martin Van Buren Nat’l Hist Site
(about 600 feet away); Lindenwald (about 600 feet away); “ . . . a Farmer in my native Town” (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Kinderhook.
 
More about this marker. The left side of the marker contains a political cartoon with the caption “This 1839 political cartoon commemorates the Declaration of Independence and the American Revolution. Below the title ‘Independence Declared’ are the portraits of the first eight presidents, with Jackson and Van Buren joining hands.” Also present on the marker are a portrait of Van Buren and a map of the Martin Van Buren National Historic Site.
 
Also see . . .
1. Martin Van Buren National Historic Site. National Park Service website. (Submitted on November 9, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Biography of Martin Van Buren. (Submitted on November 9, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
Lindenwald Mansion image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 1, 2010
4. Lindenwald Mansion
President Van Buren's home, Lindenwald, is located a short distance south of the marker.
Martin Van Buren Home image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 1, 2010
5. Martin Van Buren Home
This photo of the rear of Lindenwald shows the tower to nowhere.
Martin Van Buren image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 9, 2015
6. Martin Van Buren
This 1864 portrait of Martin Van Buren by Georege P. A. Healy hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC, on loan from the White House.

“Martin Van Buren's genius as a backroom strategist earned him the nickname of ‘Little Magician.’ But when he succeeded to the White House following his tenure as Andrew Jackson's vice president, the gift for orchestration that he had enlisted to promote Jackson's cause proved of little use in advancing his own. At the heart of the problem was an economic depression that persisted through most of his term and for which he was blamed. Damaging him further was a taste for the finer things of life, which led critics to portray him as indifferent to the country's suffering. Van Buren's reputation has improved, however, and today he is often lauded for his evenhanded foreign policy and landmark support for limiting the hours of workers on public projects.

This was one of the first likenesses that the White House acquired under an 1857 congressional act authorizing the purchase of presidential portraits. The artist named to do the work in the legislation was George P. A. Healy, one of mid-nineteenth­century America's most popular portraitists.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 9, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 542 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on November 9, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   2. submitted on November 12, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3, 4, 5. submitted on November 9, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   6. submitted on September 26, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.
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