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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Newburg in Charles County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Cliffton

 
 
Cliffton image. Click for full size.
By Richard White, November 24, 2007
1. Cliffton
Inscription. The home of Major Roderick G. Watson is two miles north of this marker. At the start of the Civil War many persons crossed the Potomac River to Virginia in this area. From 1862 to the end of the war, Thomas A. Jones served as a Confederate agent forwarding mail from the South to the North and Canada. Mary, daughter of Major Watson, hung a signal in a dormer window of Cliffton when it was not safe for the mail boat to cross from Virginia.
 
Erected by Charles County Civil War Centennial Commission.
 
Location. 38° 22.312′ N, 76° 57.584′ W. Marker is in Newburg, Maryland, in Charles County. Marker is on Crain Highway (U.S. 301) near Cliffton Road, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Newburg MD 20664, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Potomac Diversion (approx. 0.2 miles away); John Wilkes Booth (approx. 0.2 miles away); Wolleston Manor (approx. 0.4 miles away); 300 Year Old Southern Red Oak (approx. 0.6 miles away); a different marker also named “Cliffton” (approx. 1.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Newburg.
 
Regarding Cliffton.
Cliffton Marker image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, November 10, 2009
2. Cliffton Marker
Looking south along Crain Highway.
According to the report in the Maryland Historical Trust Historic Sites Survey, "Clifton No. 2 was first identified in the early 1970's by J. Richard Rivoire just prior to the site's subdivision, now Clifton on the Potomac. At the time it was believed that htis was the home of Josiah Fendall and plans were underway to convert the structure into a museum. Later research revealed that the existing 18th c. structure was likely built as a dependency for a much larger dwelling. After learning this, the building and its plans were abandoned leading to its eventual collapse in the mid-1980's."
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Cliffton Marker image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, November 10, 2009
3. Cliffton Marker
Looking west at the entrance to community of Cliffton on the Potomac.
Outbuilding, Cliffton image. Click for full size.
Historic American Buildings Survey, circa 1935
4. Outbuilding, Cliffton
This 18th century structure was thought to have been Clifton. Further research revealed that it was but one of many outbuildings on the property.
Outbuilding, Cliffton (interior) image. Click for full size.
Historic American Buildings Survey, circa 1935
5. Outbuilding, Cliffton (interior)
Outbuilding, Cliffton image. Click for full size.
Historic American Buildings Survey, circa 1935
6. Outbuilding, Cliffton
Outbuilding, Cliffton image. Click for full size.
Historic American Buildings Survey, circa 1935
7. Outbuilding, Cliffton
Outbuilding, Cliffton image. Click for full size.
Historic American Buildings Survey, circa 1935
8. Outbuilding, Cliffton
Outbuilding, Cliffton (interior) image. Click for full size.
Historic American Buildings Survey, circa 1935
9. Outbuilding, Cliffton (interior)
Outbuilding, Cliffton (interior) image. Click for full size.
Historic American Buildings Survey, circa 1935
10. Outbuilding, Cliffton (interior)
Outbuilding, Cliffton (interior) image. Click for full size.
Historic American Buildings Survey, circa 1935
11. Outbuilding, Cliffton (interior)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 8, 2007, by Richard White of La Plata, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,544 times since then and 61 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on November 28, 2007, by Richard White of La Plata, Maryland.   2, 3. submitted on November 15, 2009, by F. Robby of Baltimore, Maryland.   4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on March 3, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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