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Lynchburg, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Spring Hill Cemetery

Confederate Generals Rest

 

—Battle of Lynchburg —

 
Spring Hill Cemetery - Confederate Generals Rest Civil War Trails marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
1. Spring Hill Cemetery - Confederate Generals Rest Civil War Trails marker
This is the final marker in the Battle of Lynchburg Trail of the Virginia Civil War Trails.
Inscription. During the Battle of Lynchburg on June 17-18, 1864, Confederate Gen. Jubal A. Early moved his reserves into the cemetery to reinforce his lines across the Lynchburg-Salem Turnpike (Fort Ave.) at Fort Early. Before dawn on Sunday, June 19, these troops marched forward into the lines to the right of Fort Early, but by then the Union army had retreated.

Organized in 1852, Spring Hill Cemetery was designed by John Notman of Philadelphia, noted for Laurel Hill Cemetery in that city and Richmond’s Hollywood Cemetery. When Jubal Early died in Lynchburg in 1894, he was buried in the southwest corner of the cemetery near the spot from which he commanded the battle. Lucy Wilhelmina Otey, who organized the Ladies’ Relief Hospital to care for the most seriously wounded throughout the Civil War, rests nearby.
 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 37° 23.734′ N, 79° 9.925′ W. Marker is in Lynchburg, Virginia. Marker is on Fort Avenue (U.S. 460), on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3000 Fort Avenue, Lynchburg VA 24501, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers
Grave of Gen. Jubal A. Early in Spring Hill Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
2. Grave of Gen. Jubal A. Early in Spring Hill Cemetery
are within walking distance of this marker. Fort Early (approx. 0.6 miles away); Jubal Early Memorial (approx. 0.6 miles away); Second Virginia Cavalry, C.S.A. (approx. 0.6 miles away); Mustered and Disbanded 1861-1865 (approx. 0.6 miles away); a different marker also named Fort Early (approx. 0.6 miles away); Virginia University of Lynchburg (approx. 0.8 miles away); Civil War in Lynchburg (approx. 0.8 miles away); Lucille Chaffin Kent (approx. 0.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lynchburg.
 
More about this marker. The marker displays three portraits to the right of the main text:
Gen. Thomas T. Munford (1831-1918) graduated from V.M.I. and was commissioned Col. Of the 2d Va. Cavalry after First Manassas, serving with the Army of Northern Virginia until Appomattox. Munford was a successful industrialist in Lynchburg after the war and is buried near his wife. - Library of Congress

Gen. James Dearing (1840-65). Commissioned a lieutenant in 1861 in the Washington Artillery of New Orleans, Dearing later served in Pickett’s Division and was commissioned a Gen. in April 1864. He died April 22, 1865 of wounds received at High Bridge and is buried here near Early. - Hicks Collection

Gen. Jubal Anderson Early (1816-94) commanded the post in Lynchburg before joining Beauregard at First Manassas. At the
Closeup of Early's grave image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
3. Closeup of Early's grave
Inscription says "Jubal Anderson Early born in Franklin Co. Va. Graduated from West Point 1837 Appointed 2d Lieut. 3d Artillery Served in Seminole War 1837-38 Member Va. Legislature 1841-42 Major of 1st Va. Infantry in Mexican War 1848 Colonel of 24th Va. Reg C.S.A. Made Lieut. Gen. May 31, 1864 Died March 2, 1894 at Lynchburg, Va. Erected by members of his family 1898"
Battle of Lynchburg, he commanded Lee’s Second Corps. Early lived in Lynchburg after the war and died March 2, 1894. - Postwar photo, Lynchburg Museum Collection
 
Regarding Spring Hill Cemetery. This is one in a series of Civil War Trails markers interpreting the Battle of Lynchburg (17-18 June 1864) and the city's role in the Civil War. Select the Civil War Virtual Tour by Marker link below to see other related markers.
 
Also see . . .  Civil War Lynchburg Virtual Tour by Markers. An eight stop Civil War Trails tour, with several Virginia state markers and other memorials added. (Submitted on December 8, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Brief Biography of Gen. James Dearing
James Griffin Dearing, Jr. was born 4/25/1840 at "Otterburne," in Campbell County, Virginia, a son of James Dearing, Sr. (from Rappahannock County) and Mary "Judy" A. Lynch. He attended Hanover Academy and was appointed to the USMA by the Honorable Thomas S. Bockock, from Castle Craig, Campbell Co., 5th Va. District. Entered USMA 7/1/58, age 18 and 2 months. Classmate of Joseph G. Blount (later of the Lynchburg Artillery). Stood 16 in a class of 54, June 1860. Resigned 4/22/1861. 2nd Lt. of the Washington
Grave of Gen. James Dearing image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
4. Grave of Gen. James Dearing
Artillery of New Orleans. Appointed captain of the Lynchburg Artillery. promoted major and commanded the 38th Battalion Light Artillery (Pickett's Division), 5/1863. Assigned command of cavalry in the district of North Carolina during the winter of 1863-64. Received rank of Lt. Colonel and command of the Horse Artillery of the Army of Northern Virginia, 4/5/1864. Appointed Lt. Col. 3/14/64; to rank 2/27/64; confirmed 5/28/64. Under Gen. Pickett's New Bern, North Carolina expedition, Dearing was in command of the artillery and cavalry. Ordered what may have been the first charge of artillery (using his old battalion) at the Battle of Plymouth. Promoted to Brig. Gen. 4/29/64, assigned command of the Laurel Brigade and returned to Virginia. Subsequently assigned to Maj. Gen. W.H.F. Lee's division. On 4/6/65, in the pistol "duel" with Lt. Col. Theodore Read, killing him instantly, but not before suffering a mortal wound himself. Daughter made claim that he was accidentally shot by one of his own men. Died 4/23/1865 at Lynchburg, the last Confederate general to die of wounds received in battle. Married Roxanna Birchett in 1864; left one daughter, Mary Lucretia Dearing, who married Judge Frank P. Christian.
    — Submitted March 27, 2009, by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia.

 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil
 
Grave of Gen. Thomas T. Munford image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
5. Grave of Gen. Thomas T. Munford
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 2, 2007, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 4,024 times since then and 52 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on December 2, 2007, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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