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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Grand Canyon National Park in Coconino County, Arizona — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Mining on Horseshoe Mesa

 
 
Mining on Horseshoe Mesa Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., November 11, 2010
1. Mining on Horseshoe Mesa Marker
Inscription.
In 1890 prospector Pete Berry staked the Last Chance copper claim 3,000 feet below you on Horseshoe Mesa. The Last Chance Mine began a 17-year flurry of activity here at Grandview Point.

For a while the Last Chance Mine thrived. The ore was rich; it claimed a World's Fair prize in Chicago in 1893 for being over 70% pure copper. But the high cost of packing ore to the rim, then shipping it to be refined, doomed the operation. Berry and his partners sold the mine in 1901. The new owners continued mining, but ceased when copper prices plunged in 1907.

Mining on Horseshoe Mesa, though short-lived , had a lasting impact. Grandview became Grand Canyon's most popular tourist area for about 10 years when Grand Canyon tourism was in its infancy. The Grandview Trail, built by Last Chance miners to reach their mines, now serves thousands of hikers each year.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Location. 35° 59.892′ N, 111° 59.27′ W. Marker is in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, in Coconino County. Touch for map. Marker is at Grandview Point, about 0.6 mile NNE of Desert View (East Rim) Drive (Arizona Highway 64). Marker is in this post office area: Grand Canyon AZ 86023, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers
Mining on Horseshoe Mesa Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., November 11, 2010
2. Mining on Horseshoe Mesa Marker
are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Grandview, 1898 (here, next to this marker); Tusayan Museum and Ruin (approx. 6.9 miles away); Tusayan Ruin Trail (approx. 6.9 miles away); Horace M. Albright (approx. 8.9 miles away); Albright Training Center History (approx. 8.9 miles away); Mission 66 (approx. 8.9 miles away); Verkamp's Curios (approx. 9.3 miles away); Grand Canyon Depot (approx. 9.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Grand Canyon National Park.
 
Also see . . .
1. Pete Berry and the Last Chance Mine. (Submitted on January 11, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. Grandview Trail. (Submitted on January 11, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. Desert View (South Rim) Drive Map. (Submitted on January 11, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. EnvironmentExplorationIndustry & Commerce
 
Photo on Mining on Horseshoe Mesa Marker image. Click for full size.
circa 1890's
3. Photo on Mining on Horseshoe Mesa Marker
[Caption reads] The Last Chance Mine on Horseshoe Mesa, 1/2 mile below the canyon rim, 1890s. Mules and burros packed everything in and packed out tons of ore. Miners earned $4.00 per day plus meals.
Photo on Mining on Horseshoe Mesa Marker image. Click for full size.
1907
4. Photo on Mining on Horseshoe Mesa Marker
[Caption reads] Inspectors sample ore in 1907 for a company report. The results were good, but copper prices crashed that year, dooming the mine.
Photo on Mining on Horseshoe Mesa Marker image. Click for full size.
1906
5. Photo on Mining on Horseshoe Mesa Marker
[Caption reads] Entrance to the "new tunnel," 1906. The narrow gauge rails brought ore from the mine and carried waste rock to the dump. The large timbers were packed in from the rim.
Photo on Mining on Horseshoe Mesa Marker image. Click for full size.
1906
6. Photo on Mining on Horseshoe Mesa Marker
[Caption reads] Canyon Copper Company dining room, 1906
Photo on Mining on Horseshoe Mesa Marker image. Click for full size.
7. Photo on Mining on Horseshoe Mesa Marker
[Caption reads] The crew poses for the company report. The crew averaged just five men between 1902 and 1907, but the camp could accommodate twenty-five.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 11, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 730 times since then and 28 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on January 11, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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