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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Cape May in Cape May County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Construction of Fort Miles

 
 
The Construction of Fort Miles Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 18, 2010
1. The Construction of Fort Miles Marker
Inscription. As war clouds gathered in the late 1930s, the Army started building massive fortifications at the entrance to the Delaware River and Bay. Called Fort Miles, the main batteries and headquarters were at Cape Henlopen, Delaware, near the main shipping channel, while a supporting battery and lookout towers were located on the Cape May side of the Bay.

Fort Miles’ charge was the protection of the highly strategic industrial centers along this waterway, including the DuPont munitions and chemical plants in Wilmington, oil refineries in Chester and shipyards in Philadelphia and Camden. Following a nationwide Harbor Defense Modernization plan, the Army Corps of Engineers began pouring the eleven-foot thick concrete emplacements for a pair of 16-inch guns in 1940. These guns (similar to those on the Battleship New Jersey) were to be the primary weapons of the fortification. The plan also called for the five additional batteries, including a 12-inch battery, two 6-inch support batteries and a 6-inch battery on the Cape May side. Together, these guns sealed off our region from enemy invasion. In addition to the land-based protection, Fort Miles also had minefields, patrol boats and airplanes to protect the Delaware River and Bay.
 
Location. 38° 56.617′ N, 74° 58.004′ 
Markers in Cape May image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 18, 2010
2. Markers in Cape May
Several markers can be found at this location. The Construction of Fort Miles marker is seen here on the right.
W. Marker is in Cape May, New Jersey, in Cape May County. Marker is on Sunset Blvd. (County Route 606), on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is located near the World War II Lookout Tower. Marker is in this post office area: Cape May NJ 08204, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Cape May during World War II (here, next to this marker); History of Coastal Defenses (a few steps from this marker); Fire Control Tower No. 23 (a few steps from this marker); The Top of the Fire Tower (a few steps from this marker); Construction of Fire Control Tower No. 23 (a few steps from this marker); The abrupt end of Fort Miles (a few steps from this marker); Landscape (a few steps from this marker); S.S. Atlantus (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Cape May.
 
More about this marker. The background of the marker contains a silhouette of the area including Fire Control Tower No. 23. Also on the marker is a photograph of “The 12" battery at Fort Miles [which] shows how guns were protected by massive concrete fortifications. Photo Courtesy Delaware State Parks, www.fortmiles.org
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. A marker for another observation towers along Delaware's coast.
 
Also see . . .
The Construction of Fort Miles Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 18, 2010
3. The Construction of Fort Miles Marker
 Fort Miles website. (Submitted on August 27, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
 
Additional keywords. coast artillery
 
Categories. Man-Made FeaturesWar, World II
 
Marker at Fire Control Tower No. 23 image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 18, 2010
4. Marker at Fire Control Tower No. 23
Marker is one of a series of markers on the walkway to the Work War II lookout tower.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 27, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 568 times since then and 29 times this year. Last updated on January 15, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 27, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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