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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Wheeling in Ohio County, West Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

B & O Railroad

“All Aboard!”

 
 
B & O Railroad Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 27, 2010
1. B & O Railroad Marker
Inscription. The Baltimore & Ohio Railroad reached Wheeling on Christmas Eve 1852 and was one of the best presents the city of Wheeling ever received. From that Christmas until the last “All Aboard!” was shouted on June 30, 1961, our city utilized this grand railroad to carry our people to the rest of the nation. Operating in Wheeling for 108 years, the B&O continued to carry made-in-Wheeling products until the 1970s.

(1) Servant of Industry
The B&O helped Wheeling’s iron, steel, coal, chemical, lumber, and tobacco industries move their products to the rest of the country. The B&O’s impact on Wheeling was felt immediately since the railroad served as the foundation upon which the various industries operated and expanded.

(2) Passenger Service
The Wheeling Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Passenger Station Building was built in 1907-1908 for $300,000. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the station is located between Market and Chapline on 16th Street. The entire B&O complex included a coach yard, a tower, a 935 foot long viaduct, and a totally independent power plant. At the time it was the third largest terminal in the B&O network. West Virginia Northern Community College currently occupies this building.

(3) Engineering Achievement
The mountainous, 379 mile distance from Baltimore
B & O Railroad Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 27, 2010
2. B & O Railroad Marker
View of what use to be the Wheeling Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Passenger Station Building.
to Wheeling was seen as insurmountable by many engineers. The Allegheny Mountains intimidated all but the heartiest of railroad engineers. Newspapers reported that the route from Cumberland to Wheeling was so bad that even a buffalo couldn't make the trek "without shaking out its teeth."

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The Wheeling National Heritage Area preserves and celebrates the city’s dramatic setting, resources and history, including its role as the birthplace of the state of West Virginia during the Civil War.

A National Heritage Area is a part of our country’s landscape that has been recognized by the United States Congress for its unique contribution to the American experience.

 
Erected by West Virginia Northern Community College.
 
Location. 40° 3.827′ N, 80° 43.313′ W. Marker is in Wheeling, West Virginia, in Ohio County. Marker is on Market Street east of 16th Street (West Virginia Route 2), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. This historical marker is located in downtown business district of Wheeling, in a small park, across the street from the Old Custom House. Marker is in this post office area: Wheeling WV 26003, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking
B & O Railroad Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 27, 2010
3. B & O Railroad Marker
View of a landscape feature that is located between the historical marker and the B & O terminal building.
distance of this marker. The Athenaeum (here, next to this marker); Baltimore and Ohio Passenger Station (here, next to this marker); Old Custom House (a few steps from this marker); The First Campaign (within shouting distance of this marker); Independence Hall (within shouting distance of this marker); First State Capitol (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Lewis and Clark (approx. 0.2 miles away); Walter Reuther (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Wheeling.
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceRailroads & Streetcars
 
B & O Railroad Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 27, 2010
4. B & O Railroad Marker
View of the historical marker with the B & O terminal building seen in the background.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 17, 2011, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 714 times since then and 27 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on January 17, 2011, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.
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