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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Boonsboro in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Stonewall Regiment

 
 
Stonewall Regiment Marker, North Face image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 2, 2006
1. Stonewall Regiment Marker, North Face
Inscription. More than 90,000 Michigan men served in the Union Army and Navy during the Civil War. The 17th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment was mustered at the Detroit Barracks in August 1862 under the command of Colonel William H. Withington. The regiment consisted of raw recruits from field, workshop and schoolroom. One company was composed almost entirely of students from Ypsilanti Normal School, now Eastern Michigan University. With less than a month of military training, the 17th left for Washington DC, on August 27, 1862. From there it was sent to the Maryland campaign. On September 14, a little more than two weeks after leaving the state and just three days before the Battle of Antietam, the regiment engaged in battle here.

The 17th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment was among the units of General Ambrose E. Burnside's 9th army corps that were engaged in battle here on September 14, 1862. The fight began around 9:00 A.M. just south of this site. Around noon a Confederate battery opened fire on the regiment, which was supporting Cook's Massachusetts Battery. The 17th held its position for several hours. At 4:00 P.M. the command was given for an assault along the entire Union line. The Confederates came out of the woods to meet the charge at a fence line in the middle of the field, then moved back to the stone walls along the
Stonewall Regiment Marker, South Face image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 2, 2006
2. Stonewall Regiment Marker, South Face
crest of the hill. The 17th advanced and captured the stone walls. Of the 500 men of the "Stonewall Regiment" engaged in battle here, 27 were killed and 114 wounded, many mortally.
 
Erected 1986 by the 17th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment, and the Bureau of History, Michigan Department of State. (Marker Number S580C.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Michigan Historical Commission marker series.
 
Location. 39° 28.259′ N, 77° 37.047′ W. Marker is near Boonsboro, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is at the intersection of Reno Monument Road and the Appalachian Trail, on the right when traveling west on Reno Monument Road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Boonsboro MD 21713, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Battle for Fox’s Gap (within shouting distance of this marker); Deaths of Two Generals (within shouting distance of this marker); Near Here in Wise’s Field (within shouting distance of this marker); The Maryland Campaign of 1862 (within shouting distance of this marker); The Lost Orders (within shouting distance of this
Marker at the "Entrance" of the Appalachian Trail Northbound image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 2, 2006
3. Marker at the "Entrance" of the Appalachian Trail Northbound
marker); Maj. Gen. Jesse L. Reno (within shouting distance of this marker); North Carolina (approx. ¼ mile away); The Dahlgren Chapel (approx. 0.9 miles away); South Mountain Summit (approx. 0.9 miles away); Battle at South Mountain (approx. 0.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Boonsboro.
 
More about this marker. Walking south on the Appalachian Trail under the tree canopy, you see the marker in the distance back-lit by the glow of the clearing behind it. Steps beyond the marker is Reno Monument Road, and across it is the grassy field with a number of other markers with the Reno Monument on the left of the trail and a parking area on the right. • This is a State of Michigan Historic Site located in Maryland.
 
Also see . . .  They called them the "Stonewall Regiment". (Submitted on May 14, 2011.)
 
Additional comments.
1. My Grandfather, George Norton, served in G company of this regiment.
George Norton survived the war and served later in the U.S. Cavalry in the west. He is my mother’s father. I served as a 20
17th Michigan Field image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 8, 2006
4. 17th Michigan Field
In this field in Fox's Gap, members of the 17th Michigan Volunteer Infantry faced off against the Confederates on September 14, 1862. The modern road cuts across the location of the stone walls mentioned on the marker. Initially the 17th Michigan stood at a point further down the east slope of South Mountain. The general attack carried them up the ridge line and across the crest close to the Reno Monument and forward toward the present day marker location.
year old machine gun sergeant in WW2 under General George S. Patton and published my memoirs in a book titled “George S.Patton’s typical Soldier.” I visited this battleground on May 4th, 2011. Note To Editor only visible by Contributor and editor    
    — Submitted May 5, 2011, by Thomas W. Clarke of York, Pa..

 
Additional keywords. Battle of South Mountain (Fox's Gap)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 27, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 16, 2006, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,320 times since then and 106 times this year. This page was the Marker of the Week May 15, 2011. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 16, 2006, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   4. submitted on February 22, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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