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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Tucson in Pima County, Arizona — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Jácome’s

 
 
Jácome's Marker - Side A image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, August 22, 2010
1. Jácome's Marker - Side A
Artist, Dale Nichols, developed this promotional graphic for Jácome’s. This stylized representation depicts the main entrance on Stone Avenue, directly across from the Pioneer Hotel Building. The medallion shown above the arched doorway is a cast relief sculpture created by Edith Hamlin for the new store. This image became the logo for Jácome’s Department Stores, Inc.
Inscription. [ Four markers are mounted to a four sided kiosk. ]

Side A:
Jácome’s Department
Stores, Inc.
1896 – 1980
This area was the final location of Jácome’s Department Store from 1951 to 1980. For twenty-nine years the people of Tucson and our neighbors in Mexico frequented this site. The concept of retail clustering began in the Tucson area when business rival, Harold Steinfeld agreed to build and lease a store to Jácome's in order to create a retail hub downtown.

Jácome's is best remembered as a successful, three-generation, family owned and operated department store. It represented one of the many successes achieved by the dedicated Mexican people who pioneered this city. The success of Jácome's was based on community involvement and dedication to the principles of honest dealings and personal friendly service.

In addition Jácome's commissioned works of art establishing a precedent for private sector support of local artists. Jácome's displayed the artistic works of Salvador Corona, Dale Nichols and Edith Hamlin. Hamlin's medallions were mounted above the arches on the exterior entrances at both Stone and Pennington and became the lasting symbol of Jácome's store.

At the Scott and Congress location, Jácome's underwent two complete renovations
Jácome's Marker - Side B image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, August 22, 2010
2. Jácome's Marker - Side B
before moving to a more prominent location at Stone and Pennington. For eighty-four years Jácome's evolved, grew and prospered as did the City of Tucson. The decline of Jácome's mirrored the decline of retailing in downtown Tucson.

The Jácome family wished to recognize and thank the many employees whose hard work, dedication, and loyalty were critical to is success.

The Jácome Children
All thirteen children of Carlos and Dionicia Jácome grew up working in their family store. They played important roles in the development of the store and they were involved in every aspect of the business. In 1928, Carlos incorporated the store with his thirteen children. Each felt responsibility, inherited from their parents, for community involvement, and many of their descendants are still active in the Tucson area. Our community continues to benefit from their contributions in the field of education, philanthropy, arts and culture.

Carlos C. Jacome, Jr.,1891-1965 • Anita Jácome Dalton, 1893-1957 • Sara Jácome Parker, 1894-1964 • Josephine Jácome Bloom, 1896-1993 • Rose Jácome Aros, 1897-1994 • Henry G. Jácome, 1898-1984 • Juan G Jácome, 1900-1980 • Ramon G. Jácome, 1902-1978 • Frank Jácome, 1902-1978 • Alejandro G. Jácome, 1906-1987 • Arthur G. Jacome 1907-1987 • Richard G. Jácome, 1911-1962 • Augustine E Jácome, 1912-1999


Side
Carlos C. Jácome - Side C image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, August 22, 2010
3. Carlos C. Jácome - Side C
1870 – 1932
"Make your store a friendly one and you will live forever"

Presented by Jacome Employees
1951
B:

Carlos Corella Jácome
1870 – 1932
Ures, Sonora – Tucson, Arizona

Dionícia Germán Jácome
1869 – 1927
Ures, Sonora – Tucson, Arizona

In 1870, Carlos Corella Jácome was born to a family of very modest means in Ures, Sonora, Mexico. In the late 1870's, the family moved to Tucson in the fertile Santa Cruz River valley. As a nine year old, Carlos stopped his education and went to work as a laborer at the Placita de San Agustin. His hard working, cheerful and conscientious nature attracted the attention of Mr. Isadore Mayer who hired the youngster. Carlos worked for Mayer & Brothers Dry Goods Store as a cash boy for two years and then became a clerk at L. Zeckendorf and Company, forerunner of Steinfeld's Department Store. This proved to be the strong foundation that supported the evolution of his family retail business.

In the early 1880's, Dionícia Germán and her mother, Doña Trinidad Montijo Jermán, arrived in Tucson from Ures, Sonora. Dionícia married Carlos in 1889, and the combined family moved into Doña Trinidad's home at 271 North Stone Avenue which still stands as of this date.

After 15 years at L. Zeckendorf, Carlos was ready to start his own business. He and Loreto Carrillo opened La Bonanza in 1896. The next evolution was Jácome and Manzo, which he
Jácome's Marker - Side D image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, August 22, 2010
4. Jácome's Marker - Side D
In recognition of
The contributions of
Three generations of
The Jácome Family in Tucson:

Hard working citizens,
Pioneers of downtown retailing
& Patrons of the arts,

This Historic Marker is dedicated
October 24, 2004
By Mayor Robert Walkup
& Tucson City Council Members
Jose Ibarra, Carol West, Kathleen Dunbar, Shirley Scott, Steve Leal, & Fred Rostadt.
formed with Genaro S. Manzo. By 1913 Carlos was on his own, but he maintained lifelong friendships with his previous partners. In 1928, Carlos incorporated Jácome's Department Store.

Carlos was naturalized as a United States citizen in October, 1894. Active in community and Political affairs throughout his life, he was one of the founding members of Alianza Hispano-Americana which provided important services to the Spanish speaking populace. At the Arizona Constitutional Convention convened in October, 1910, Carlos was one of five delegates elected to represent Pima County. When Arizona statehood became a reality in 1912, Carlos was very proud of his contribution to both his state and country.

Carlos remained active in business and community affairs until his death in 1932. The success of Jácome's Department Store, Inc. during its eight-four year history is directly attributable to the hard work and sacrifice of Carlos and Dionícia, their children and grandchildren.
 
Erected 2004 by Mayor Robert Walkup & Tucson City Council Members, Jose Ibarra, Carol West, Kathleen Dunbar, Shirley Scott, Steve Leal, & Fred Ronstadt.
 
Location. 32° 13.367′ N, 110° 58.283′ W. Marker is in Tucson, Arizona, in Pima County. Marker is at the intersection
Stone Avenue and Pennington image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, December 4, 2010
5. Stone Avenue and Pennington
Jácome's Marker is in center of photo.
of North Stone Avenue and East Pennington Street, on the right when traveling south on North Stone Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is on northwest corner. Marker is at or near this postal address: 106 North Stone Avenue, Tucson AZ 85701, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Roy Place "Montgomery Ward" Building (a few steps from this marker); Stone Avenue (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Congress Street (about 300 feet away); Fox Tucson Theatre (about 300 feet away); Convent Street (about 400 feet away); Pennington Street (about 400 feet away); S. E. Corner Adobe Wall of Spanish Presidio of Tucson (about 500 feet away); Pima County Courthouse (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tucson.
 
Categories. Hispanic AmericansIndustry & Commerce
 
Jácome's Department Store Marker Kiosk image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, August 22, 2010
6. Jácome's Department Store Marker Kiosk
Jácome's Department Store Marker Kiosk image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, August 22, 2010
7. Jácome's Department Store Marker Kiosk
Jácome’s Store at Stone & Pennington image. Click for full size.
September 11, 1951
8. Jácome’s Store at Stone & Pennington
Photo Copied from Arizona Historical Society Library & Archives/Tucson
Interior of Jacome's Store – 1916 image. Click for full size.
circa 1916
9. Interior of Jacome's Store – 1916
Photo Copied from Arizona Historical Society Library & Archives/Tucson Left to right- Adalberto García Vélez (clerk), Juan Jácomé, ?, Benito Ariza (material cousin to Adalberto), Lupe Leon (clerk), Henry Jácomé (w/hat), Alberto Aragon (clerk), Henry Anderson (clerk), Carlos C. Jácomé and Alex Jácomé (w/books returning from school). Other three are customers.
Interior of Jacome's Store – Late 1920's image. Click for full size.
circa 1920's
10. Interior of Jacome's Store – Late 1920's
Photo Copied from Arizona Historical Society Library & Archives/Tucson
Jácome’s Store at Scott & Congress - Early 1930's image. Click for full size.
circa 1930's
11. Jácome’s Store at Scott & Congress - Early 1930's
Photo Copied from Arizona Historical Society Library & Archives/Tucson
Doña Trinidad's home at 271 North Stone Avenue image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, August 29, 2010
12. Doña Trinidad's home at 271 North Stone Avenue
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 30, 2010, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. This page has been viewed 2,256 times since then and 68 times this year. Last updated on February 3, 2011, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 30, 2010, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.   5. submitted on December 4, 2010, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.   6, 7. submitted on August 30, 2010, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.   8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on December 4, 2010, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.   12. submitted on August 30, 2010, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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