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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Greenville in Greenville County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Woodlawn Memorial Park Veterans Memorial

 
 
Woodlawn Memorial Park Veterans Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 6, 2011
1. Woodlawn Memorial Park Veterans Memorial
Inscription.
In honor of those who served
in the Armed Forces of the
United States of America

In Memory of
All American Veterans
This memorial honors all American veterans who, although separate by generations, shared a common, undeniable goal -- to valiantly protect our country's freedoms.

The memories of these American veterans will continue to live on whenever and wherever democracy exists.

The American veterans -- forever a symbol of heroism, sacrifice, loyalty and freedom.
 
Erected by Woodlawn Memorial Park.
 
Location. 34° 53.067′ N, 82° 21.833′ W. Marker is in Greenville, South Carolina, in Greenville County. Marker can be reached from Pine Knoll Drive (County Road 165). Touch for map. Memorial is located near the northwest corner of the cemetery. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1 Pine Knoll Drive, Greenville SC 29609, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Camp Sevier (approx. 0.8 miles away); Gassaway Mansion (approx. 1.7 miles away); a different marker also named Camp Sevier (approx. 1.8 miles away); Brutontown
Woodlawn Memorial Park Veterans Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 6, 2011
2. Woodlawn Memorial Park Veterans Memorial
(approx. 2.3 miles away); Rev. James R. Rosemond (approx. 2.3 miles away); Fulton H. Anthony Memorial Bridge (approx. 2.4 miles away); Fountain Fox Beattie House / Greenville Women's Club (approx. 2.4 miles away); McPherson Park (approx. 2.5 miles away); "The Poplars" / Elias Earle (approx. 2.6 miles away); Whitehall (approx. 2.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Greenville.
 
Also see . . .
1. Find a Grave: Woodlawn Memorial Park. Find-a-Grave search of famous people buried at Woodlawn. (Submitted on February 6, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Woodlawn Memorial Park History. Woodlawn Memorial Park was established in 1938 by Mr. Clyde M. Gaffney, Sr. and was the first non-monumental cemetery in South Carolina. (Submitted on February 6, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. HeroesMilitaryPatriots & Patriotism
 
Woodlawn Memorial Park Veterans Memorial -<br>Atop Veterans Hill image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 6, 2011
3. Woodlawn Memorial Park Veterans Memorial -
Atop Veterans Hill
The Last Supper Relief -<br>Located in the Eastern Section of the Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 6, 2011
4. The Last Supper Relief -
Located in the Eastern Section of the Cemetery
This is a Cemetery... image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 6, 2011
5. This is a Cemetery...
Lives are commemorated -
Deaths are recorded -
Families are reunited -
Memories are made tangible -
And love is undisguised.
This is a cemetery.

Communities accord respect,
Families bestow reverence,
Historians seek information
And our heritage is thereby enriched.

Testimony of devotion, pride and
Remembrance are cast in bronze to pay
Warm tribute to accomplishment
And to the life - not the death -
Of a loved one.
The cemetery is homeland for memorials
That are a sustaining source of comfort
to the living.

A cemetery is a history of people -
A perpetual record of yesterday and a
Sanctuary of peace and quiet today.
A cemetery exists because every life
Is worth living and remembering -
Always.
A Solitary Life Monument -<br>Author Unknown image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 6, 2011
6. A Solitary Life Monument -
Author Unknown
Here is a man who was born of Jewish parents in an obscure village, the child of a peasant woman.

He grew up in another obscure village. He worked in a carpenter shop until He was thirty, and then for three years He was an itinerant preacher. He never wrote a book.

He never held an office. He never owned a home. He never had a family. He never went to college. He never put His foot in a big city.

He never traveled two hundred miles from the place where he was born. He never did one of the things that usually accompany greatness. He had no credentials but Himself.

He had nothing to do with this world except the naked power of his divine manhood. While still a young man, the tide of popular opinion turned against Him. His friends ran away. One of them denied him. He was turned over to His enemies. He went through the mockery of a trial.

He was nailed to a cross between two thieves. His executioners gambled for the only piece of property He had on earth while He was dying - and that was His coat. When he was dead He was taken down and laid in a borrowed grave through the pity of a friend.

Nineteen wide centuries have come and gone and today He is the centerpiece of human race and the leader of the column of progress. I am far within the mark when I say that all the armies that ever marched, and all the navies that ever were built, and all the parliaments that ever sat, and all the kings that ever reigned, put together have not affected the life of man upon this earth as powerfully as has that One Solitary Life.
A Solitary Life Monument image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 6, 2011
7. A Solitary Life Monument
Remember God's Promise -<br>Plaque at Base Reads image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 6, 2011
8. Remember God's Promise -
Plaque at Base Reads
This feature is the gift of:
Elizabeth Gaffney Tyson
and
Thurman Franklin Tyson
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 6, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 573 times since then and 28 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on February 6, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
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