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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Wheatland in Yuba County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Camp Far West Cemetery

 
 
Camp Far West Cemetery Monument image. Click for full size.
By Margaret Tomer Rummens, April 5, 2009
1. Camp Far West Cemetery Monument
The bronze plaques originally mounted on the obelisk are missing and the monument has been extensively vandalized.
Inscription.
[ Inscribed on the monument: ]
Side A:
To the Memory of the Pioneers
who were buried here between the years
1844 – 1856

Side B:
Erected
1911
By the Grand Parlor
Native Sons of the
Golden West


[ Inscription on missing bronze plaque: ]
In Honor of the Known
Military Buried Here
Pvt. George Eckweller, Co.F., 2nd Inf. 1849 Pvt. John Stevenson, Co.F., 2nd Inf. 1849 Pvt. Newton Barnes, Co.F., 2nd Inf. 1849 Pvt. Baldwin, Co.E., 2nd Inf. 1850

 
Erected 1911 by Grand Parlor, Native Sons of the Golden West.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Native Sons/Daughters of the Golden West marker series.
 
Location. Marker has been confirmed missing. It was likely located near 39° 2.373′ N, 121° 20.587′ W. Marker was in Wheatland, California, in Yuba County. Marker could be reached from Camp Far West Road south of Spenceville Road/Camp Beale Highway. Touch for map. Monument is located approximately 4.5 miles east of Wheatland. Marker was in this post office area: Wheatland CA 95692, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this location
Camp Far West Cemetery Monument image. Click for full size.
By Margaret Tomer Rummens, April 5, 2009
2. Camp Far West Cemetery Monument
, measured as the crow flies. Overland Emigrant Trail (approx. 2.3 miles away); The Graham Hotel (approx. 2.4 miles away); Truckee Trail – To Johnson Ranch (approx. 2.4 miles away); Union Shed (approx. 4.5 miles away); Durst Hop Ranch (approx. 4.5 miles away); Sheridan Cemetery (approx. 4.6 miles away); Johnson's Ranch (approx. 4.7 miles away); Holland House (approx. 4.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Wheatland.
 
More about this marker. The cemetery and monument are located on private property and are not accessible by the public.
 
Regarding Camp Far West Cemetery. In his book California, a Landmark History, published in 1941, Joseph R. Knowland writes: Camp Far West, located several miles east of Wheatland, was marked in 1911 by a monument erected by the Native Sons of the Golden West. This camp was established by the United States Government in 1849 to protect the early settlers of Yuba County and was abandoned in 1852. Many pioneers are buried in the ancient cemetery. No buildings remain.
 
Also see . . .  Camp Far West. The Wheatland Historical Society's article on the history of Camp Far West which offers photos of the site and a link to photos of military personnel who were
Camp Far West Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Margaret Tomer Rummens, April 5, 2009
3. Camp Far West Cemetery
at the camp. (Submitted on March 3, 2011.) 
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesForts, Castles
 
Camp Far West Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Margaret Tomer Rummens, April 5, 2009
4. Camp Far West Cemetery
Camp Far West Dedication Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, February 7, 2011
5. Camp Far West Dedication Plaque
This dedication plaque is located at the intersection of Spenceville Road and Main Street in Wheatland. (39.013978N,-121.419093W)
Camp Far West
US Army Outpost
1849 - 1852

Dedicated by
Camp Far West Parlor No. 218
Native Daughters of
The Golden West
May 6, 1950
Camp Far West Dedication Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, February 7, 2011
6. Camp Far West Dedication Plaque
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 3, 2011, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California. This page has been viewed 1,061 times since then and 81 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on March 3, 2011, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.
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