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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Prague in Malá Strana, Hlavní město Praha, Czech Republic — Capital City Region
 

The 25th of February, 1948

25.Února 1948

 
 
The 25th of February, 1948 Marker (In Czech) image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, August 22, 2009
1. The 25th of February, 1948 Marker (In Czech)
Inscription. {Marker text in Czech:}
Bylí v téchto místech a na Hradčanském Námĕstí brutálnĕ napadeni ozbrojenou komunistickou policií vysokoškoláci, kteří v mnohatisícovém pochodu na hrad šli podpořit Prezidenta Beneše v úsilí zachovat svobodou a democracii.

Na pamět odvážných studentů, kteří se v osudových chvílích našeho národa nebáli vzepřít nastupujícímu bezpráví.

Pražský Akademický Klub 48     Senát Parlamentu ČR

{Directly to the right of the marker, a plaque translating the marker into English has been provided, reading:}

A multi-thousand march of university students heading to Prague Castle in support of President Benes and his effort to preserve freedom and democracy, was brutally attacked by armed communist police at this place and in Hradcany Square. In memory of the brave students who, at the fateful moments of this Nation, were not afraid of opposing incoming lawlessness.

The Prague Academic Club 48       The Senate of the Parliament of the Czech Republic
 
Erected 2003 by The Prague Academic Club 48; The Senate of the Parliament of the Czech Republic.
 
Location. 50° 5.322′ N, 14° 23.814′ E. Marker
The 25th of February, 1948 Marker - plaque of text translated into English image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, August 22, 2009
2. The 25th of February, 1948 Marker - plaque of text translated into English
is in Prague, Hlavní město Praha, in Malá Strana. Marker is at the intersection of Nerudova and Ke Hradu on Nerudova. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Prague, Hlavní město Praha 257 535, Czech Republic.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Jan Neruda (within shouting distance of this marker); Michael the Brave (1558-1601) (approx. 0.3 kilometers away); Tycho Brahe Lived Here (approx. 0.4 kilometers away); Ema Destinnová (approx. 0.6 kilometers away); Ladislav Zelenka (approx. 0.7 kilometers away); Josef Mysliveček (approx. 1.2 kilometers away); The Novotny Footbridge (approx. 1.2 kilometers away); Church of St. Salvador (approx. 1.3 kilometers away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Prague.
 
Also see . . .  Plaque unveiled on Nerudova street to commemorate 1948 student march. Radio Prague's report on the unveiling of the plaque: "... On the 25th February 1948, the Communist Party chief and hardline Stalinist, Klement Gottwald, announced to ecstatic crowds on Prague's Wenceslas Square that Czechoslovakia's government had resigned, and that his Communists were now in power. This was the last nail in the coffin of Czechoslovakia's fragile post-war democracy, and the start of forty years of hardline communism. A service to mark one of the bleakest anniversaries in modern Czech history
The 25th of February, 1948 Marker- wide view image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, August 26, 2009
3. The 25th of February, 1948 Marker- wide view
The marker is visible here in the middle of the picture, on the retaining wall. In the foreground is Nerudova Street, and where the pedestrians are ascending is Ke Hradu, "to the Castle". Hradcany Square (mentioned on the marker), is the square at the top of Ke Hradu, and is somewhat analogous in terms of setting and use to the National Mall in Washington, DC.
was held on Tuesday morning at the Church of the Virgin Mary in Prague's Nerudova Street, and a little further up the same street a memorial plaque was unveiled. This was the spot where the police had used force to turn back a march by non-communist students. The students had been making their way up to Prague Castle to express their support for President Edvard Benes, the last hope for democracy. The suppression of the march was a taste of things to come. Four months later President Benes was succeeded by one of the most brutal post-war Communist dictators, Klement Gottwald."
(Submitted on March 15, 2011.) 
 
Categories. Notable Events
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 14, 2011, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 508 times since then and 29 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on March 14, 2011, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.   3. submitted on March 15, 2011, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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