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Trenton in Mercer County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Trenton Battle Monument

 
 
Trenton Battle Monument Marker - (Back of Monument) image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, December 2007
1. Trenton Battle Monument Marker - (Back of Monument)
Inscription. (On the back Panel):
This monument is erected by the Trenton Battle Monument Association to commemorate the victory gained by the American Army over the forces of Great Britain in this town on the 25th day of December Anno Domini 1776

(On the front door):
All our hopes were blasted by that unhappy affair at Trenton
From the speech of Lord George Germain, Colonial Secretary of State of King George III in British House of Commons, May 3, 1779
 
Erected 1893 by Society of the Cincinnati in the State of New Jersey.
 
Location. 40° 13.55′ N, 74° 45.887′ W. Marker is in Trenton, New Jersey, in Mercer County. Marker is at the intersection of North Warren Street (New Jersey Route 1) and North Broad Street (U.S. 206), on the right when traveling
Trenton Battle Monument Marker - (Front Door) image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, December 2007
2. Trenton Battle Monument Marker - (Front Door)
south on North Warren Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Trenton NJ 08618, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Trenton Battle Monument (here, next to this marker); Black Soldiers and Patriots (a few steps from this marker); Mount Zion A.M.E. Church (approx. ¼ mile away); Headquarters of Colonel Johann Gottlieb Rall (approx. ¼ mile away); Fitch’s Shop (approx. ¼ mile away); John Fitch’s Gun Shop (approx. ¼ mile away); Route Taken by Washington (approx. ¼ mile away); Town Hall and Jail (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Trenton.
 
More about this marker. The monument commemorates the Revolutionary War Battle of Trenton, fought Dec. 26, 1776. It cost approximately $60,000, with funds provided by the state of New Jersey
Trenton Battle Monument image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, December 2007
3. Trenton Battle Monument
A colossal bronze full-length statue of George Washington tops a granite monument. The sculpture stands on an acanthus leaf pedestal which surmounts a pavilion, which in turn surmounts a 150-foot tall granite Roman Doric column.
($15,000), Congress ($30,000) and private citizens of the state ($15,000). Land for the monument was acquired in 1886 and the cornerstone was laid on Dec. 26, 1891 on the 115th anniversary of the Battle. The monument was designed by John Hemingway Duncan; the Washington sculpture by William Rudolf O'Donovan.

Bronze relief plaques are mounted on three sides. The plaques depict Washington crossing the Delaware, the opening of the Battle of Trenton, and the surrender of the Hessians. These plaques are reproductions of ones made by Thomas Eakins and Charles Henry Niehaus.

Inside the monument is an elevator that rises through the monument's 150-foot tall granite Roman Doric column. A view from the observation deck near the top of the monument is provided in picture seven.
 
Also see . . .  Trenton Battle Monument Information on SIRIS. SIRIS is the Smithsonian Institute Research Information System, an online, searchable database of outdoor American Sculpture. (Submitted on December 12, 2007, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Notable EventsNotable PersonsWar, US Revolutionary
 
Front of the Trenton Battle Monument image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, December 2007
4. Front of the Trenton Battle Monument
The Eakins bronze relief plaque in this view depicts the opening of the Battle of Trenton.
The central entrance door is flanked by a pair of bronze, full-length figures of Continental soldiers.
Eakins Bronze Plaque on the Left Side of the Monument image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, December 2007
5. Eakins Bronze Plaque on the Left Side of the Monument
The bronze relief plaque in this view depicts Washington crossing the Delaware.
Niehaus Bronze Plaque on the Right Side of the Monument image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, December 2007
6. Niehaus Bronze Plaque on the Right Side of the Monument
The bronze relief plaque in this view depicts the surrender of the Hessians.
Looking through the railing at the top of the monument. image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, December 2007
7. Looking through the railing at the top of the monument.
View looking south over the monument park from the observation deck. image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, December 2007
8. View looking south over the monument park from the observation deck.
Warren (King) Street is on the right, Broad (Queen) Street is on the left.
Relief on South Side of Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, February 27, 2010
9. Relief on South Side of Monument
The relief panel on the front of the monument depicts Knox's artillery preparing to fire down King and Queen Streets during the December 26, 1776 Battle of Trenton.
Relief on East Side of Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, February 27, 2010
10. Relief on East Side of Monument
The right side of the monument contains a relief panel showing the surrender of the Hessians to the American Army.
Relief on West Side of Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, February 27, 2010
11. Relief on West Side of Monument
The relief panel on the monument's left side shows the Continental Army during the Christmas night crossing of the Delaware River.
Trenton Battle Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, December 29, 2012
12. Trenton Battle Monument
American troops at the start of the Battle of Trenton reenactment in front of the Trenton Battle Monument.
Reenactors at the Trenton Battle Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, December 29, 2012
13. Reenactors at the Trenton Battle Monument
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 11, 2007, by Gary Nigh of Trenton, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,606 times since then and 52 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on December 11, 2007, by Gary Nigh of Trenton, New Jersey.   9, 10, 11. submitted on March 26, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   12, 13. submitted on December 30, 2012, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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