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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Middletown in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Middletown

“Middle of What?”

 
 
Middletown – “Middle of What?” Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 2, 2006
1. Middletown – “Middle of What?” Marker
Inscription. Noted for the tall white spire of the Zion Lutheran Church, Middletown has been framed by its picturesque valley for over two centuries. German Protestants, fleeing persecution in Europe, founded the community before the American Revolution. Michael Jesserong, who laid out the town, named it Middletown as he sold four lots to Conrad Crone in 1768. No one is sure what the name means. Perhaps it refers to the community as the center of its own Middletown Valley, midway between South Mountain and Braddock Heights.

That valley, with its rich argriculture, gave the town a ready marker from the start. When the National Road came through in the early 1800's, Middletown became a welcome respite between two steep mountain ridges. Harness, blacksmith and carriage shops joined the tavers and hotels that serviced the parade of travelers passing on Main Street. Locals began to refer to their street as "the main road from Baltimore to the western states." The "main road" also brought several Union and Confederate armies during the Civil War. Middletown was ransomed from Confederate General Jubal Early in 1864 for the grand sum of $1,500.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the The Historic National Road marker series.
 
Location. 39° 26.63′ N, 77° 
Close-Up of Photograph Reproduced on Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 2, 2006
2. Close-Up of Photograph Reproduced on Marker
"East Main Street, looking west, Middletown, Md." "The white Zion Lutheran Church has been the signature structure in Middletown since it was built in 1859. At the time of this photo, Main Street, the National Pike, cut a wide, muddy swath through town."
32.879′ W. Marker is in Middletown, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker is at the intersection of West Main Street (Alternate U.S. 40) and Elm Street, on the left when traveling west on West Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 200 West Main Street, Middletown MD 21769, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Middletown (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Middletown (here, next to this marker); Appleman's Tannery (a few steps from this marker); Middletown in the Civil War (within shouting distance of this marker); Joshua Beckwith House (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Middletown.
 
More about this marker. One of a series of American Byways markers entitled "The Historic National Road. The Road that Built the Nation."
 
Also see . . .  Middletown – “Middle of What?”. PDF version of this marker (Submitted on March 12, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio.) 
 
Categories. Roads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers
 
Markers in front of The Lamar House image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 2, 2006
3. Markers in front of The Lamar House
This marker, and two others, facing the sidewalk in front of the Lamar House, once a turn-of-the-19th-century rural medical sanitarium. It is now headquarters for The Central Maryland Heritage League.
Zion Lutheran Church image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 21, 2007
4. Zion Lutheran Church
Middletown Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, June 24, 2009
5. Middletown Marker
Markers located on right
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 25, 2006, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,890 times since then and 46 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 25, 2006, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   4. submitted on July 23, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5. submitted on August 9, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.
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