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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Manassas, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Manassas Museum

Defending the Junction

 

—First and Second Manassas Campaigns —

 
The Manassas Museum - Defending the Junction Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 2, 2007
1. The Manassas Museum - Defending the Junction Marker
Inscription. During the 1850s two railroad lines, the Orange & Alexandria and the Manassas Gap, intersected at a small Prince William County village that became known as Manassas Junction. In 1861 more than 20,000 Confederate troops from across the South gathered in what is today downtown Manassas. Working alongside slaves requisitioned from local farms, they built a ring of earthen fortifications around the junction. Naval cannon captured in Norfolk were included in the defenses, manned by Confederate sailors.

The First Battle of Manassas (Bull Run) was fought five miles northwest of here on July 21, 1861. Following their victory, Confederate forces occupied their fortifications over the winter of 1861-62, building the world’s first military railroad between Manassas and Centerville seven miles to the North.

When the Confederates evacuated Manassas Junction in March 1862, the site became a major Union supply base. It was destroyed by Southern troops under Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson on August 27, 1862, prior to the Second Battle of Manassas (August 28-30). The area remained under Union control for the rest of the war. Railroad operations were periodically disrupted by Confederate partisans under Col. John S. Mosby. Despite the desolation caused by the war, Manassas quickly recovered to become a prosperous agricultural
Front of Manassas Museum - Two Civil War Trails Markers image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 2, 2007
2. Front of Manassas Museum - Two Civil War Trails Markers
and transportation center in the Northern Virginia Piedmont.

The Manassas Museum System includes the city’s only surviving Civil War earthworks—the Mayfield Confederate Fort, and the Union’s Cannon Branch Fort. Information on these and other historic sites is available at the Manassas Museum.
 
Erected by Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails, and the Virginia, Wartime Manassas Walking Tour marker series.
 
Location. 38° 44.925′ N, 77° 28.296′ W. Marker is in Manassas, Virginia. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Prince William Street and Main Street, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Located at the front of the Manassas Museum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 9101 Prince William Street, Manassas VA 20110, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Wartime Manassas (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Wartime Manassas (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Manassas 1905 - The Great Fire (about 400 feet away); Site of Manassas Junction (about 600 feet away); a different marker also named Wartime Manassas
Interior View of Mayfield Fortifications image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 2, 2007
3. Interior View of Mayfield Fortifications
Located to the east of downtown Manassas, off Quarry Road, this is one of two earthworks preserved inside the city. The Cannon Branch Fort is not open to the public, but is being restored.
(about 600 feet away); a different marker also named Wartime Manassas (about 600 feet away); a different marker also named Wartime Manassas (about 700 feet away); a different marker also named Wartime Manassas (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Manassas.
 
More about this marker. On the lower left, a photo of Union soldiers in one of the Manassas fortifications is captioned, “Union soldiers occupied the Manassas Junction earthworks following the Confederate evacuation in March 1862. This photograph is attributed to Mathew Brady assistant Timothy O’Sullivan.”

A drawing on the upper right is captioned, “Harper’s Weekly lithograph showing Confederate defenses at Manassas. Visible are Confederate sailors and the distinctive “soda bottle” shapes of captured Dahlgren naval cannon” - Harper’s Weekly, September 14, 1861.

The lower right has a photo of damaged railroad equipment, “Demolished buildings, ruined locomotives and widespread debris show the ravages of war at Manassas and the Northern Virginia Piedmont.”
 
Related markers. Click here for
Manassas Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 6, 2007
4. Manassas Battlefield
Looking past the Stone House (foreground) at Henry House Hill, both landmarks of the First and Second Battles of Manassas.
a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Additional keywords. First Manassas Campaign, Second Manassas Campaign
 
Categories. Railroads & StreetcarsWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 11, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,993 times since then and 65 times this year. Last updated on April 7, 2011, by Jonathan Carruthers of Bealeton, Virginia. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 11, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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