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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Culpeper in Culpeper County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Cedar Mountain

Jackson Draws His Sword

 
 
Cedar Mountain Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
1. Cedar Mountain Marker
Inscription. In the summer of 1862, Federal Gen. John Pope threatened to retaliate against Southern civilians who tried to thwart the efforts of his new army. The threats prompted Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee to issue Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson the somber order: "I want Pope to be suppressed."

Outnumbered by Pope's forces, Jackson sought an opportunity to attack an isolated portion of the Union command, and discovered one at Cedar Mountain on the severely hot day of August 9, 1862.

Jackson's force of 22,000 men advanced north along the Culpeper Road (visible directly behind you, which also extended ahead of you in 1862). The Confederates encountered Federal Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks with 12,000 soldiers blocking the road of a mile ahead of you.

Jackson quickly placed his men into line along Crittenden Lane, to your right, anchoring the position on the shelf of Cedar Mountain, the high ground to your right. As the Confederates went into position, an artillery duel erupted. Near the gate at this end of the Crittenden Lane, Confederate Gen. Charles S. Winder was mortally wounded when a shell lacerated his abdomen.

About 5 p.m., Federal infantry assaulted. Jackson easily repulsed the attack on his center but preparation on his left had not been completed when Federal Gen. Samuel W. Crawford struck and shattered
Map of the Battle of Cedar Mountain image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
2. Map of the Battle of Cedar Mountain
the Confederate line.

Here at the gate, Jackson rode into the midst of a desperate struggle. An observer stated, "The escape of Jackson from death was miraculous. He was in the thickest of the combat." Waving his sword (rusted to his scabbard) and crying "Jackson is with you," the commander successfully rallied his men. The opportune arrival of reinforcements stabilized the line, and then drove the Federals back toward Culpeper.

The Confederates suffered about 1,400 casualties and the Union losses numbered about 2,500.
 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 38° 24.306′ N, 78° 4.112′ W. Marker is near Culpeper, Virginia, in Culpeper County. Marker is at the intersection of General Winder Road (County Route 657) and James Madison Highway (U.S. 15), on the right when traveling west on General Winder Road. Touch for map. Located at the pull-off and trail head for the Civil War Preservation Trust's Cedar Mountain Battlefield walking trail. Marker is in this post office area: Culpeper VA 22701, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Battle of Cedar Mountain (here, next to this marker);
Several Markers at the Cedar Mountain Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
3. Several Markers at the Cedar Mountain Battlefield
Perhaps is it possible to have too many markers designating a Civil War site.
a different marker also named The Battle of Cedar Mountain (a few steps from this marker); Hand-to-Hand Fighting (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Cedar Mountain (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Cedar Mountain (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Cedar Mountain (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named The Battle of Cedar Mountain (about 600 feet away); a different marker also named The Battle of Cedar Mountain (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Culpeper.
 
More about this marker. In the upper center, "This Edwin Forbes image was made from behind the Federal position. The clouds of smoke in the distance denote the Confederate line running from Cedar Mountain (at left) to the far tree line on the right." A map of the battle is on the upper right corner of the marker.
 
Regarding Cedar Mountain.
Location of Crittenden Gate image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
4. Location of Crittenden Gate
The trail head for the Cedar Mountain walking trail. The original path of the Orange and Culpeper Road is to the right of the snake-rail fence. Crawford's Federals broke through Confederate lines at this point, where disparate hand-to-hand fighting occurred. Jackson rallied the Confederates and prevented a full route, while General A.P. Hill's division arrived to reinforce the line.
This is one of several markers interpreting the Battle of Cedar Mountain. See the Battle of Cedar Mountain Virtual Tour by Markers linked below.
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Cedar Mountain. National Park Service summary of the battle and driving tour. The marker is at the first tour stop. (Submitted on December 31, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. The Battle of Cedar Mountain. Details the battle and includes a set of animated maps of the battle. (Submitted on January 1, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Battle of Cedar Mountain Virtual Tour by Markers. A set markers that document the Battle of Cedar Mountain, August 9, 1862. (Submitted on January 1, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 31, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,478 times since then and 94 times this year. Last updated on April 12, 2011, by Jonathan Carruthers of Bealeton, Virginia. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 31, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on December 30, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on January 1, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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