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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Gordon in Wilkinson County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

He Wouldn't Run

 
 
He Wouldn't Run Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, April 1, 2011
1. He Wouldn't Run Marker
Inscription. J. Rufus Kelly, 18, was a member of Co. B, 14th Ga. Infantry, Confederate Army. At Jericho Ford, Va. when the 14th had orders to fall back, young Kelly kept advancing, waving his hat and rifle and urging his comrades to come on. When the retreat continued, Kelly teamed up with another brigade, losing a leg in battle. Back home at Gordon on crutches, he voluntarily spied on Sherman’s Army advancing from Macon. Dashing into Gordon on horseback, he warned Georgia’s Adjutant General Henry C. Wayne that the federals were coming, then roundly cursed the [CS] Officer for entraining his 700 cadets and paroled convicts for flight from the 100,000 oncoming [US] marchers.

“I will defend the women and children of Gordon alone,” Kelly told Gen. Wayne on the porch of the old Solomon Hotel here. Aided by one man, John R. Bragg, Kelly went out to meet the advancing Union forces and killed one soldier. The advance was delayed until the Union forces deployed around Gordon. They captured Kelly when his horse staggered, and sentenced him to be shot. But he wasn’t. He escaped from a wagon crossing the Ogeechee Swamp and lived for many years after the war. He is buried at Liberty Hill Church near Myrick's Mill Pond in Twiggs County.
 
Erected 1953 by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker
He Wouldn't Run Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 29, 2017
2. He Wouldn't Run Marker
Marker was moved from Milledgeville Road to Macon Road, near the Gordon Train Depot Museum.
Number 158-1.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission, and the Shermans March to the Sea marker series.
 
Location. 32° 52.908′ N, 83° 20.044′ W. Marker is in Gordon, Georgia, in Wilkinson County. Marker is at the intersection of Macon Road and Jackson Street, on the left when traveling north on Macon Road. Touch for map. Marker has be moved 13 miles next to the Gordon Train Depot Museum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 90 Jackson Street, Gordon GA 31031, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The March to the Sea (here, next to this marker); The Evacuation of Gordon (here, next to this marker); In Memory of J. Rufus Kelly (here, next to this marker); The Stoneman Raid (here, next to this marker); Gordon (within shouting distance of this marker); Ramah Church (approx. 1.6 miles away); Battle of Griswoldville (approx. 5.3 miles away); Myricks Mill (approx. 6.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Gordon.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
The "He Wouldn't Run" marker is now on far left of 4 markers, at new location. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 29, 2017
3. The "He Wouldn't Run" marker is now on far left of 4 markers, at new location.
He Wouldn't Run Marker at former location. image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, April 1, 2011
4. He Wouldn't Run Marker at former location.
He Wouldn't Run Marker at former location. image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, April 1, 2011
5. He Wouldn't Run Marker at former location.
Looking southeast on Milledgeville Road (Georgia Highway 243) at the BASF Kaolin plant, which dominates the town. The He Wouldn't Run Marker is the closest of the four markers.
He Wouldn't Run Marker at former location. image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, April 1, 2011
6. He Wouldn't Run Marker at former location.
Looking northwest on Milledgeville Road (Georgia Highway 243) toward the intersection with Gray Highway (Georgia Highway 18). The "He Would't Run" marker is the fourth in the row.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 12, 2017. This page originally submitted on April 16, 2011, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 626 times since then and 96 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on April 16, 2011, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   2, 3. submitted on May 1, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.   4, 5, 6. submitted on April 16, 2011, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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