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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Atlanta in Fulton County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Burning and Destruction of Atlanta

 
 
The Burning of Atlanta Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, April 11, 2011
1. The Burning of Atlanta Marker
Inscription. After capturing Atlanta in September 1864 during the Civil War, Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman, before leaving Atlanta on the March to the Sea, ordered the destruction of all railroads, factories, and commercial buildings of possible use to the Confederacy. On Nov. 11, 1864, Chief Engineer Orlando M. Poe directed the demolition of stone and brick buildings using specially made battering rams. On Nov. 15, Poe’s troops burned the wooden buildings in the downtown business district around the site of this marker. Though houses and churches were not targeted, some were burned nonetheless. Many houses had already been dismantled by both armies to make way for fortifications. Contrary to popular myth only forty percent of Atlanta was left in ruins.

Erected for the Civil War 150 commemoration by the Georgia Historical Society and the Georgia Department of Economic Development
 
Erected 2011 by Georgia Historical Society and the Georgia Department of Economic Development. (Marker Number 60-9.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 33° 45.083′ N, 84° 23.317′ W. Marker is in Atlanta, Georgia, in Fulton County. Marker
The Burning of Atlanta Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, April 11, 2011
2. The Burning of Atlanta Marker
is at the intersection of Martin Luther King Jr Drive and Central Avenue SW, on the right when traveling west on Martin Luther King Jr Drive. Touch for map. The marker stands some distance from Martin Luther King Jr Drive, in front of the Georgia Railroad Depot. This is just outside the entrance to Underground Atlanta. Marker is at or near this postal address: 645 Martin Luther King Jr Drive, Atlanta GA 30314, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Georgia Railroad Freight Depot (within shouting distance of this marker); Immaculate Conception Church (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Eternal Flame Of The Confederacy (about 500 feet away); Historic Ground (about 600 feet away); John Brown Gordon (about 600 feet away); Transfer of Command (about 700 feet away); The Battle of Atlanta (about 700 feet away); Thomas E. Watson (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Atlanta.
 
More about this marker. There have been protests against the marker's location, and it may be moved.
 
Also see . . .  Video - - Dedication of Marker ::. (Submitted on June 24, 2011, by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
The Burning of Atlanta Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, April 11, 2011
3. The Burning of Atlanta Marker
The Georgia Freight Depot, one of the oldest buildings in downtown Atlanta, is in the background.
The Burning of Atlanta Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, April 11, 2011
4. The Burning of Atlanta Marker
The marker prior to its dedication
The Burning of Atlanta Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, April 11, 2011
5. The Burning of Atlanta Marker
The marker dedication ceremony
The Burning of Atlanta Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, April 11, 2011
6. The Burning of Atlanta Marker
Hermina Glass-Avery, the Associate Director of the Center for the Study of the Civil War Era at Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, Georgia, speaks at the dedication of the marker.
The Burning of Atlanta Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, April 11, 2011
7. The Burning of Atlanta Marker
The marker after its unveiling
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 19, 2011, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 1,312 times since then and 78 times this year. Last updated on April 24, 2011, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on April 19, 2011, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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