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Trenton in Mercer County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

William Trent of Trentís Town

 
 
William Trent of Trentís Town Marker image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
1. William Trent of Trentís Town Marker
Inscription. By the end of the 17th century William Trent, a native of Inverness Scotland, had established himself as a prominent Philadelphia merchant trading in flour, tobacco, rum and molasses, slaves and indentured servants. His shipping interests extended throughout the Middle Atlantic colonies to the Caribbean and across the Atlantic to Britain, besides amassing substantial landholdings in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Trent was elected to the Pennsylvania Assembly and appointed both to the Provincial Council and as a Justice of the Supreme Court.

In 1714, his Philadelphia fortunes and popularity apparently on the decline, Trent bought and eventually relocated to Mahlon Stacyís plantation at the Falls of the Delaware. He rebuilt and expanded Stacyís mill, erected a fine brick mansion called “Bloomsbury Court” (known today as the William Trent House) and laid out the streets for a new town, “Trentís Town,” on the north bank of the Assunpink Creek. Almost three centuries later, these streets – Broad, Warren, Front and State – still provide the physical framework for Trentonís downtown.

William Trent was influential in both Hunterdon and Burlington County government representing Burlington in the New Jersey Assembly, serving as a judge in Hunterdonís Court of Common Pleas and as a Colonel in
The four subject markers under the 17th Century Arch image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
2. The four subject markers under the 17th Century Arch
the Hunterdon Militia. In 1723, the year before his death, he was appointed Chief Justice of New Jersey. Williamís son James Trent retained ownership of Bloomsbury Court following his fatherís death but sold the estate in 1729 to William Morris, a wealthy English merchant from Barbados.

Links to learn more – William Trent House, Trenton; Pennsbury Manor, Bucks County
 
Erected 2004 by New Jersey Department of Transportation.
 
Location. 40° 11.887′ N, 74° 45.498′ W. Marker is in Trenton, New Jersey, in Mercer County. Marker can be reached from U.S. 29. Touch for map. This marker is part of South River Walk Park which is built over Route 29. Marker is in this post office area: Trenton NJ 08611, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Europeans at the Falls of the Delaware (here, next to this marker); Quakers Lead the Settlement of West Jersey (here, next to this marker); The West Jersey Proprietors Rule (here, next to this marker); Pre-17th Century Trenton Timeline (here, next to this marker); Native American Artifacts – Clubs to Prehistory (here, next to this marker); Who, What and Where were Sanhickans? (here, next to this marker); Native Americans Exchange Furs for European Goods (here, next to this marker); What happened to the Lenape? (here, next to this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Trenton.
 
More about this marker. This is one of 4 subject markers under the 17th Century Arch.
 
Also see . . .  The William Trent House. The three markers at this link are located at the William Trent House, the fine brick mansion originally known as “Bloomsbury Court”, and mentioned in this marker. (Submitted on December 17, 2007, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraNotable Persons
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 16, 2007, by Gary Nigh of Trenton, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,272 times since then and 25 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 16, 2007, by Gary Nigh of Trenton, New Jersey. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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