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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Trenton in Mercer County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

18th Century Trenton Timeline

 
 
18th Century Trenton Timeline Marker image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
1. 18th Century Trenton Timeline Marker
Inscription. (see the individual stones photographed below)
 
Erected 2004 by New Jersey Department of Transportation.
 
Location. 40° 11.896′ N, 74° 45.501′ W. Marker is in Trenton, New Jersey, in Mercer County. Marker can be reached from U.S. 29. Touch for map. This marker is part of South River Walk Park which is built over Route 29. Marker is in this post office area: Trenton NJ 08611, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 17th Century Trenton Timeline (here, next to this marker); Slavery – An “Odious and Disgraceful” Practice (a few steps from this marker); The Battles of Trenton, Turning Point of the Revolution (a few steps from this marker); From Federal City to State Capital (a few steps from this marker); Trentonís Early Houses of Worship (a few steps from this marker); Who, What and Where were Sanhickans? (a few steps from this marker); Native Americans Exchange Furs for European Goods (a few steps from this marker); What happened to the Lenape? (a few steps from this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Trenton.
 
Categories. Colonial EraNotable EventsNotable PersonsWar, US Revolutionary
 
18th Century Arch at the end of this timeline. image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
2. 18th Century Arch at the end of this timeline.
18th Century Trenton Timeline Marker image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
3. 18th Century Trenton Timeline Marker
1702 image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
4. 1702
The proprietors of East and West Jersey relinquish the government of the provinces to Queen Anne, and New Jersey becomes a Royal Colony
1714 image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
5. 1714
Hunterdon County forms from the northern portion of Burlington County with the Assunpink Creek serving as a boundary
1719 image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
6. 1719
William Trent, merchant of Philadelphia, builds the brick mansion, today known as the Trent House, on land purchased from Mahlon Stacy, Jr.
<b>c. 1720 image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
7. c. 1720
William Trent lays out a street plan for a new settlement later known as Trentís Town
1723 image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
8. 1723
William Trent and Samuel Green establish a water-powered ironworks on the Assunpink Creek at Trentís Town
1726 image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
9. 1726
James Trent, son of William Trent, receives a royal charter for the operation of a ferry across the Delaware River
1745 image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
10. 1745
King George II grants Trenton status as a Royal borough
1747 image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
11. 1747
Trenton citizens form the Union Fire Company, the townís first volunteer fire group
1750 image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
12. 1750
The Trenton Library Company, founded by Dr. Thomas Cadwalader, opens the first subscription library in New Jersey
1758 image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
13. 1758
The colonial government authorizes the construction of the Trenton barracks to house soldiers fighting in the French and Indian War
1776 image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
14. 1776
General Washington crosses the Delaware River and marches south, defeating Hessian troops deployed by the British at the First Battle of Trenton
1777 image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
15. 1777
American forces lead by George Washington clash with the British army under the command of Lord Cornwallis at the Second Battle of Trenton
1778 image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
16. 1778
Isaac Collins relocates his printing press and newspaper, the New Jersey Gazette, from Burlington to Trenton, becoming the townís first publisher
1784 image. Click for more information.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
17. 1784
The Continental Congress meets at the French Arms Tavern in Trenton to discuss the future location of the United States government
Click for more information.
1786 image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
18. 1786
John Fitch builds and operates the first steamboat on the Delaware River between Philadelphia and Trenton
1789 image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
19. 1789
The Ladies of Trenton give George Washington a grand reception while he is en route from Philadelphia to New York to take office as the first President of the United States of America
1790 image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
20. 1790
The State Legislature selects Trenton as the seat of the capital of the State of New Jersey
1791 image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
21. 1791
Jonathan Doan and the State House Commission draw up plans for the construction of the New Jersey State House
1792 image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
22. 1792
Trenton incorporates as a city
1793 image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
23. 1793
The Ancient Free and Accepted Masons erect the Masonic Lodge, one of Trentonís most prominent 18th century institutional buildings
1799 image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
24. 1799
The public offices of the United States government transfer from Philadelphia to Trenton due to a yellow fever epidemic
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 16, 2007, by Gary Nigh of Trenton, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 3,014 times since then and 22 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24. submitted on December 16, 2007, by Gary Nigh of Trenton, New Jersey. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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