Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Cherry Valley in Otsego County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Lieutenant Wormuth Killed

 
 
Lieutenant Wormuth Killed Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, May 14, 2011
1. Lieutenant Wormuth Killed Marker
Inscription.
From
behind this
rock
Joseph Brant
shot
and killed
Lieut
Wormuth
May 1778
Erected by
Cherry Valley
Chapter
D.A.R.
1914

 
Erected 1914.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 42° 49.61′ N, 74° 44.201′ W. Marker is near Cherry Valley, New York, in Otsego County. Marker is on Van Derwerker Road, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Cherry Valley NY 13320, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Cherry Valley Museum (approx. 2.2 miles away); Civil War Monument (approx. 2.3 miles away); Indian Trail and Military Road (approx. 2.3 miles away); Cherry Valley Massacre (approx. 2 miles away); Colonel Alden Felled (approx. 2.7 miles away); Flint Homesite (approx. 3.3 miles away); General James Clinton (approx. 4.7 miles away); Camp and Fort (approx. 4.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Cherry Valley.
 
Categories. Settlements & SettlersWar, US Revolutionary
 
Lieutenant Wormuth Killed Marker image. Click for full size.
By Scott J. Payne, September 19, 2015
2. Lieutenant Wormuth Killed Marker
Lieutenant Wormuth Killed Marker image. Click for full size.
By Scott J. Payne, September 19, 2015
3. Lieutenant Wormuth Killed Marker
View from behind rock. This would have been Brant's viewpoint.
Lieutenant Wormuth Killed Marker image. Click for full size.
By Scott J. Payne, September 19, 2015
4. Lieutenant Wormuth Killed Marker
Here Brant lay in wait behind a large rock near the main road leading to the Mohawk River, about two miles north of Cherry Valley. A short distance from this the road wound along near the top of a ledge of rocks, forming a precipice one hundred and fifty feet high. It was shaded by evergreens and dark even in mid day. Its wildness was increased by the dashing of a small stream which fell over this precipice, called by the Indians the falls of the Tekaharawa. That day, Lieutenant Matthew Wormwood (Warmuth) came up from the Mohawk River and informed the garrison that Colonel Klock would arrive the next day with a part of his regiment of militia. It was almost night when he started to return, accompanied by Lieutenant Peter Sitz, the bearer of some dispatches. Throwing down his portmanteau he mounted his horse, saying he would not need it until his return on the morrow, with his company. The fine personal appearance of this young officer, who was clad in a rich suit of velvet, attracted much attention during his stay, and many persons remained at the door, looking at the horsemen until they were hid by the hill over which they passed. The clattering hoofs had scarcely died away when the report of a volley of musketry was heard. Soon after Wormwood's horse returned. The saddle was covered with blood, which excited fears for his fate but too well grounded. A party went out that evening but could make no discoveries. The next morning the body was found behind the rock before mentioned. They had arrived near the rock, when they were hailed, and ordered to stop. Disregarding the order they put spurs to their horses, and endeavored to pass. The Indians immediately fired; Wormwood was wounded and fell from his horse, when Brant, rushing out, tomahawked him with his own hand. They had been personal friends before the war and Brant is said to have lamented his death; at the time he supposed him to be a Continental officer. Lieutenant Sitz's horse was killed and he himself taken prisoner. The dispatches which he carried were double. He had presence of mind to destroy the paper containing the true account of the garrison, and to give Brant the other. Brant retried without doing any other injury. The next day, Colonel Klock arrived. The father of Wormwood (Peter), who had been immediately apprised of the death of his son was a wealthy man, living in Palatine District opposite Fort Plain, and this was his only son. His feelings as he bent over the dead and mutilated body were excruciating and when in the agony of his soul, he cried out "Brant, cruel, cruel Brant," tears started in many an eye which scarcely knew how to weep. Information from the following website: http://www.threerivershms.com/wormuth.htm
Lieutenant Wormuth Killed Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, May 14, 2011
5. Lieutenant Wormuth Killed Marker
Joseph Brant hid and fired from behind the large rock in the background.
Lieutenant Wormuth Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, May 14, 2011
6. Lieutenant Wormuth Marker
The view north along Van Derwerker Road, north of Route 20.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 15, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 958 times since then and 65 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on May 15, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.   2, 3, 4. submitted on September 19, 2015, by Scott J. Payne of Deposit, New York.   5, 6. submitted on May 15, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement