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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Oyster Bay in Nassau County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

A Place in History

 
 
A Place in History Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, May 28, 2011
1. A Place in History Marker
Inscription. It was on this piazza that Teddy Roosevelt was notified of his nomination for Governor of New York in 1898, for Vice President in 1900, and for President in 1904. He had the railing removed here to address more effectively groups gathered on the lawn below. The group shown in this photo is made up of representatives from the woman-suffrage movement.
 
Location. 40° 53.124′ N, 73° 30.087′ W. Marker is in Oyster Bay, New York, in Nassau County. Marker can be reached from Sagamore Hill Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located at Sagamore Hill National Historic Site, in front of the Roosevelt Home. Marker is in this post office area: Oyster Bay NY 11771, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Theodore Roosevelt (here, next to this marker); Quentin Roosevelt (here, next to this marker); The House (within shouting distance of this marker); Mounting Platform (within shouting distance of this marker); Atop Sagamore Hill (within shouting distance of this marker); Copper Beech (within shouting distance of this marker); The Ice House (within shouting distance of this marker); Up to the Roosevelts (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Oyster Bay.
 
More about this marker.
Marker at Sagamore Hill image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, May 28, 2011
2. Marker at Sagamore Hill
The Roosevelt Home can be seen in this photo behind the marker.
The right side of the marker features a photograph of Theodore Roosevelt on the porch of the Roosevelt Home addressing the crowd.
 
Also see . . .
1. Biography of Theodore Roosevelt. The White House website. (Submitted on May 31, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Sagamore Hill National Historic Site. National Park Service website. (Submitted on May 31, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

3. Theodore Roosevelt Speaking at Sagamore Hill [1916-1918] . Library of Congress. (Submitted on July 1, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

4. Theodore Roosevelt speaking from the piazza at Sagamore Hill and reviewing 13th Regiment, 1917 . Library of Congress. (Submitted on July 1, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Notable Places
 
A Place in History Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, May 28, 2011
3. A Place in History Marker
Marker in Oyster Bay image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, May 28, 2011
4. Marker in Oyster Bay
The "A Place in History" marker is seen here next to the flagpole and the gravestone of Teddy's son Quentin who died in World War I.
Closeup of Photo from Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, May 28, 2011
5. Closeup of Photo from Marker
Roosevelt Home at Sagamore Hill image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, May 28, 2011
6. Roosevelt Home at Sagamore Hill
This photo of the Roosevelt Home, taken from the marker, shows the portion where TR had the railing removed so that he could better address the crowd.
Theodore Roosevelt image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 9, 2015
7. Theodore Roosevelt
This 1967 portrait of Theodore Roosevelt by Adrian Lamb after Philip de Lászlo's 1908 original hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC.

“No one ever craved the presidency more than Theodore Roosevelt or used its powers more joyously. In early 1901, however, his rise toward that office was suddenly checked. Having gained national prominence as a civil service reformer, Spanish-American War hero, and reform-minded governor of New York, he was now relegated to being William McKinley's vice president. But McKinley's assassination several months later changed everything, and Roosevelt was soon rushing headlong into one of American history's most productive presidencies. By the time he left office in 1909, his accomplishments ranged from implementing landmark efforts to conserve the nation's disappearing natural heritage, to instituting some of the first significant curbs on the excesses of big business, to building the Panama Canal.

When Hungarian-born English artist Philip de Lászlo painted the original version of this portrait, he encouraged Roosevelt to have visitors chat with him during the sittings, apparently thinking that it made for a more animated likeness.” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 31, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 326 times since then and 14 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on May 31, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   7. submitted on October 24, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.
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