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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Menomonie in Dunn County, Wisconsin — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Fine Meadows

Where... Droves of Buffaloes and Elks were Feeding

 

—Jonathan Carver, 1767 —

 
Fine Meadows Marker image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, April 27, 2011
1. Fine Meadows Marker
Inscription. Where were these "Buffaloes and Elks?" Wyoming? Montana? No, they were feeding in the prairies along the banks of the Chippewa River, roaming as far north as Chippewa Falls.

The dry conditions of prairies allowed only certain grasses, wildflowers, and a few shrubs to prosper. With very few trees for farmers to cut, the prairies were quickly converted to cropland. Today, less than one percent of the original tallgrass prairie remains!

[map] Shaded areas indicate original prairie areas.
 
Erected 1988 by the Wisconsin Departments of Transportation and Natural Resources.
 
Location. 44° 54.504′ N, 91° 54.505′ W. Marker is near Menomonie, Wisconsin, in Dunn County. Marker can be reached from Interstate 94 at milepost 43, 2.6 miles west of County Highway B, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at Rest Area 62. Marker is in this post office area: Menomonie WI 54751, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. World War I (within shouting distance of this marker); Wisconsin's Oak Savanna (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Fine Meadows
Fine Meadows Marker image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, April 27, 2011
2. Fine Meadows Marker
(about 600 feet away); Dunn County Veterans Memorial (about 600 feet away); Chippewa Valley White Pine (about 700 feet away); Dr. Stephen Tainter (approx. 1.4 miles away); Evergreen Cemetery / Earliest Evergreen Burials (approx. 1.4 miles away); Stori House (approx. 2.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Menomonie.
 
Also see . . .
1. Prairie. Wikipedia entry. (Submitted on June 3, 2011.) 

2. What is a Prairie?. Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. (Submitted on June 3, 2011.) 
 
Categories. AnimalsEnvironment
 
Nearby World War I Marker image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, April 27, 2011
3. Nearby World War I Marker
The plantings and displays are to the left of this marker.
Nearby Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, April 27, 2011
4. Nearby Plaque
The native plantings and natural resources displays in this rest area were cooperatively prepared by the Wisconsin Departments of Transportation and Natural Resources.
–Tommy G. Thompson, Governor
July 1988
Arid Adaptations image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, April 27, 2011
5. Arid Adaptations
A prairie plant has many special features that allow it to live in dry, windy areas. Find these features on the real plants nearby for a lesson on finding and holding water.

Big Bluestem · Stiff Goldenrod · Side-oats Grama · Black-eyed Susan · Butterfly Weed · Rough Blazingstar · Little Bluestem · Purple Prairie Clover

Coating. Waxy or shiny looking leaves may have a covering that slows evaporation.

Leaves. Narrow leaves, as found on grasses, present only a small surface area to drying winds and the sun.

Hair. Tiny hairs on stems and leaves slow air movement and thus evaporation from the plants' surface.

Spacing. Do you see the bare ground between the plants? Spacing keeps plants from competing for water.

Roots. About 2/3 of a prairie plant lives below ground. Many threadlike roots near the soil surface quickly gather new rainfall. Deep taproots reach water buried far below. In some plants, such as prairie blazingstar, roots may reach 14 feet down!
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 3, 2011, by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 310 times since then and 16 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on June 3, 2011, by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin.
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