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Locust Grove in Orange County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Battle of Payne’s Farm

A Fruitless Campaign

 
 
The Battle of Payne’s Farm CWT Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, June 6, 2011
1. The Battle of Payne’s Farm CWT Marker
Inscription. “In the fight of Johnson’s Division on last Friday I was under as warm a musketry fire as I have experienced for a good while—certainly worse than I have been in since Sharpsburg.” — Lt. Col. Alexander S. “Sandie” Pendleton, CSA

“One of the sharpest & best fought affairs of the war. The musketry was the most terrific any of us had ever heard, and the chances of getting off without a decent wound was about as poor as it possibly could have been.” — Col. Charles T. Collis, 114th Pennsylvania Infantry, USA

A few days after the Battle of Payne’s Farm, Union and Confederate forces were poised to fight on a larger scale west of Locust Grove. Both sides planned assaults, but Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee posted his troops in such a strong position along Mine Run that Union Gen. George G. Meade decided to withdraw. This robbed Lee of his opportunity to strike his adversary’s left flank. Both sides returned close to their former positions and made camp for the winter.

Although the battle here was relatively small, the soldiers who fought at Payne’s Farm did not view this as an unimportant engagement. They wrote of a fight equal in ferocity with better-known eastern battles like Antietam, Chancellorsville, and the Wilderness. Dwarfed in total losses
View of the rebel position at Mine run--2nd corps batteries in foreground image. Click for full size.
By Alfred R. Waud, 1863
2. View of the rebel position at Mine run--2nd corps batteries in foreground
Library of Congress [LC-DIG-ppmsca-22416]
by Gettysburg and dimmed in retrospect by the apparent uselessness of the entire movement, Mine Run remains a little-known campaign. This very obscurity, however, contributed significantly to the almost unparalleled preservation of this battlefield.
 
Erected 2011 by The Civil War Trust and Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 38° 20.024′ N, 77° 49.475′ W. Marker is in Locust Grove, Virginia, in Orange County. Marker can be reached from Zoar Road (Virginia Route 611) near Zoar School Road. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 31334 Zoar Road, Locust Grove VA 22508, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named The Battle of Payne’s Farm (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named The Battle of Payne’s Farm (about 600 feet away); a different marker also named The Battle of Payne’s Farm (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named The Battle of Payne’s Farm (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named The Battle of Payne’s Farm
Brandy Station, Virginia. Camp at headquarters, Army of the Potomac image. Click for full size.
By Timothy O'Sullivan, Apr 1864
3. Brandy Station, Virginia. Camp at headquarters, Army of the Potomac
Library of Congress [LC-B817- 7495]
(approx. Ľ mile away); The Mine Run Campaign (approx. Ľ mile away); a different marker also named The Mine Run Campaign (approx. Ľ mile away); a different marker also named The Battle of Payne’s Farm (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Locust Grove.
 
Regarding The Battle of Payne’s Farm. On the lower left is a sketch with the caption, "Union II Corps commander, Gen. Gouverneur K. Warren successfully maneuvered his troops around the Confederate right flank, but before he could launch his assault, Gen Robert E. Lee countered with a corps of his own and hastily erected entrenchments. In this image, II Corps batteries go into action. — Courtesy Library of Congress"

In the center is a photograph with the caption, "Although the Mine Run Campaign was a failed Union effort, at least the Federal high command came to know the terrain south of the Rapidan River. While Meade’s Army of the Potomac camped for the winter around Brandy Station in Culpeper County (above), his new commander arrived — Gen. Ulysses S. Grant. When Grant ordered Meade forward the following spring, he advanced into the Wilderness with a far better knowledge
Opposing forces at Mine Run image. Click for full size.
4. Opposing forces at Mine Run
of the country that lay ahead. — Courtesy Library of Congress"

On the lower right is a map with the caption, "Gen. Meade planned an all-out assault for November 30, while Gen. Lee planned to strike the Union left with a strong force. The very strength of the Confederate position, however, precipitated the Union withdrawal and an end to the campaign."
 
Also see . . .
1. Mine Run. Civil War Trust (Submitted on June 6, 2011, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 

2. Mine Run. CWSAC Battle Summary (Submitted on June 6, 2011, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Payne’s Farm Lane image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, June 6, 2011
5. Payne’s Farm Lane
Payne’s Farm Lane from Zoar Church Road image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, June 6, 2011
6. Payne’s Farm Lane from Zoar Church Road
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 6, 2011, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 944 times since then and 89 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on June 6, 2011, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.
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