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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Kansas City in Platte County, Missouri — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Rail Center

 
 
Rail Center Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., December 19, 2010
1. Rail Center Marker
Inscription.
If you wanted a steak in New York before 1867, you pretty much had to wait until your dinner came in on four legs from Texas to the railheads in central Missouri, and finally hitched a train to Chicago. It was there that cattle were unceremoniously turned into top sirloin and T-bones, and sent by train to restaurants on the East Coast.

But 800-mile cattle drives from Texas to Missouri were hardly an efficient way to move meat. There were weather, bandits and Indian Territory with which to contend. Thatís what got meat packer, Joseph McCoy, thinking. As the Kansas Pacific Railroad stretched from Kansas City to the west, McCoy searched for a new spot for a railhead in Kansas. That, he figured, could cut hundreds of miles off the cattle drive. He found his spot in Abilene, and the railhead was established. That same year, Octave Chanute began building the Hannibal Bridge, the first span across the Missouri River at Kansas City; thus completing the link between east and west trade.

Of course, in the 20th century, rails were necessary to move people more quickly as well. In 1914, Kansas City celebrated the opening of Union Station, designed by Chicago architect, Jarvis Hunt. Soldiers from two world wars said good-bye to their loved ones here, and the lucky ones returned through its gates to be reunited again at the warís
Rail Center Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., December 19, 2010
2. Rail Center Marker
end.

Today, Union Station has been returned to its glorious Beaux-Arts opulence and is now home to Science City Museum, as well as a host of popular entertainment and dining experiences. The station was placed on the National Historic Register in 1972.
 
Erected by Kansas City International Airport. (Marker Number B10.)
 
Location. 39° 18.746′ N, 94° 42.169′ W. Marker is in Kansas City, Missouri, in Platte County. Touch for map. Marker is at Passenger Kiosk B10, in Economy Parking Lot B, at Kansas City International Airport, 601 Brasilia Avenue. Marker is in this post office area: Kansas City MO 64153, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Art and Soul (within shouting distance of this marker); Football Fever (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); KC: On Flight (about 500 feet away); Home of BBQ (about 600 feet away); The American Royal (about 700 feet away); Atkins Gift (approx. 0.2 miles away); Mouse Tale (approx. 0.2 miles away); Hale: The Firepole (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Kansas City.
 
More about this marker. The Economy Parking Lots' passenger kiosks each have unique historical markers and flashy artwork to
Rail Center Marker Artwork image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., December 19, 2010
3. Rail Center Marker Artwork
help passengers remember where they parked.
 
Also see . . .
1. History of Kansas City Southern Railway. (Submitted on June 7, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. Kansas City Union Station. (Submitted on June 7, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Economy Parking Lot B Entrance image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr.
4. Economy Parking Lot B Entrance
<i>Union Station, Showing Train Sheds † Kansas City, Mo.</i> image. Click for full size.
circa 1920
5. Union Station, Showing Train Sheds † Kansas City, Mo.
<i>New Union Station Kansas City, Mo.</i> image. Click for full size.
circa 1920
6. New Union Station Kansas City, Mo.
Built in 1914, Union Station opens her arms with 850,000 square feet of amazing space that originally featured 900 rooms. In her prime as a working train station, she accommodated hundreds of thousands of passengers each year. During WWII, an estimated one million travelers – many of them soldiers -- passed through the Station. The North Waiting Room (now Sprint Festival Plaza) held 10,000 people and the complex included restaurants, a cigar store, barber shop, railroad offices, the nation's largest Railway Express Building (used for shipping freight and mail) as well as a powerhouse providing steam and power. So many stories of farewells, reunions and of day-to-day vibrancy still echo in her walls....-- Unionstation.org
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 7, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 273 times since then and 20 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 7, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   4. submitted on June 6, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   5, 6. submitted on September 6, 2015.
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