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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Richmond, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

White House of the Confederacy

 
 
White House of the Confederacy image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 21, 2007
1. White House of the Confederacy
Inscription. Built in 1818 as the residence of Dr. John Brockenbrough, this National Historic Landmark is best known as the executive mansion for the Confederate States of America, 1861-1865. President Jefferson Davis and is family lived here until Confederate forces evacuated Richmond on 2 April 1865. After serving five years as the headquarters of Federal occupation troops, the house became one of Richmondís first public schools. In 1890, the Confederate Memorial Literary Society saved the mansion from destruction and between 1896 and 1976 used it as the Confederate Museum. The Society restored the house to its wartime appearance and reopened it to the public in 1988.
 
Erected 1998 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number SA 50.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 37° 32.458′ N, 77° 25.779′ W. Marker is in Richmond, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of Clay Street and 12th Street, on the right when traveling east on Clay Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1201 Clay Street, Richmond VA 23219, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Presidentís Mansion (a few steps
Marker with Confederate Executive Mansion in background image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 21, 2007
2. Marker with Confederate Executive Mansion in background
The White House of the Confederacy is a National Historic Landmark.
from this marker); Alexander H. Stephens House Site (a few steps from this marker); Maupin - Maury House (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Matthew Fontaine Maury (about 300 feet away); Wickham-Valentine House (about 300 feet away); Grant House / Sheltering Arms Hospital (about 400 feet away); Valentine Museum (about 500 feet away); The Edward V. Valentine Sculpture Studio (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Richmond.
 
Also see . . .  White House of the Confederacy. Museum of the Confederacy page. (Submitted on December 30, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Notable BuildingsWar, US Civil
 
Clay Street entrance to President Davis's residence image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 21, 2007
3. Clay Street entrance to President Davis's residence
The White House of the Confederacy is located adjacent to the Museum of the Confederacy.
Formal Entrance and Courtyard image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 21, 2007
4. Formal Entrance and Courtyard
During the war, Clay Street was a dusty road, so President Davis used the entrance on the mansion's southern side as formal entrance.
Confederate Museum Formerly Jefferson Davis' Residence image. Click for full size.
By Tuck & Sons
5. Confederate Museum Formerly Jefferson Davis' Residence
VCU Libraries Digital Collections - Rarely Seen Richmond
Confederate Museum, Jefferson Davis' Mansion, Richmond, Va image. Click for full size.
By Detroit Publishing Co.
6. Confederate Museum, Jefferson Davis' Mansion, Richmond, Va
VCU Libraries Digital Collections - Rarely Seen Richmond
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 29, 2007, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,185 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on December 29, 2007, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   5, 6. submitted on May 10, 2012, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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