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Ewing in Lee County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Indian Mound

 
 
Indian Mound Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 29, 2011
1. Indian Mound Marker
Inscription. A short distance north is the Ely Mound, the best-preserved Indian mound in Virginia. It dates to the Late Woodland-Mississippian Period (AD 1200–1650), during which more complex societies and practices evolved, including chiefdoms and religious ceremonies. Often, temples, elite residences, and council buildings stood atop substructure or townhouse mounds such as Ely Mound. Lucien Carr, assistant curator of the Peabody Museum in Boston, led an excavation here in 1877. By proving the connection between this mound and present-day Indians. Carr refuted the then-popular “lost race” hypothesis for Mound Builders in eastern North America.
 
Erected 2000 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number K-3.)
 
Location. 36° 39.22′ N, 83° 24.043′ W. Marker is in Ewing, Virginia, in Lee County. Marker is on Daniel Boone Trail (Business U.S. 58) just west of Smith Hollow Road, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Ewing VA 24248, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Indian Mound Marker in the Distance image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 29, 2011
2. Indian Mound Marker in the Distance
The Daniel Boone Trail monument is in the foreground on the right.
At least 4 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. White Rocks (approx. 2.7 miles away); Martinís Station (approx. 3 miles away); John Ball (approx. 3.2 miles away); Thompson Settlement Church (approx. 11 miles away).
 
More about this marker. This marker replaced an earlier marker with the same name and number which read, “the knoll a short distance to the north is an Indian burial mound. The Cherokees were the principal tribe inhabiting this region.”

1930s marker guidebooks list another marker with the same name and number at this location which read, “the two knolls a short distance to the north are Indian burial mounds.”
 
Also see . . .
1. Indian mound in Lee County may reveal secrets of the past. Article by Walter Littrell in the Kingsport (Tennessee) Time-News. “Just a few days of careful, exacting excavation has already uncovered a trove of ancient artifacts from a Mississippian period Indian mound in Western Lee County, and because the isolated site has been relatively undisturbed since it was abandoned, archaeologists
Daniel Boone Trail Monument image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 29, 2011
3. Daniel Boone Trail Monument
A number of these identical monuments can be found along the original route of U.S. 58. The plaque reads, “Daniel Boone Trail, from North Carolina to Kentucky. Marked by the Virginia Daughters of the American Revolution.”
working the dig anticipate finding enough to start a small museum.” (Submitted on July 8, 2011.) 

2. Woodland Indians in Virginia. Page in Charles A. Grymesí Virginia Places website. “Ely Mound is one of three mounds in Lee County that may have formed a city complex. It was excavated in the 1870s. At that time the mound still had the rotting cedar posts of what may have been a building used by tribal leaders of that area. Ely Mound is about as close to Monticello or Mount Vernon as you can get, for that now-vanished culture.” (Submitted on July 8, 2011.) 
 
Categories. LandmarksNative Americans
 
View of Indian Mound image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 29, 2011
4. View of Indian Mound
This view is from the Daniel Boone Trail monument.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 7, 2011, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 997 times since then and 67 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on July 7, 2011, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   2, 3, 4. submitted on July 8, 2011, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.
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