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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Culpeper in Culpeper County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Battle of Cedar Mountain

August 9, 1862

 
 
The Battle of Cedar Mountain Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
1. The Battle of Cedar Mountain Marker
Inscription. In the summer of 1862 General John Pope formed the Federal Army of Virginia. While the elements of this new 63,000-man army were converging upon Culpeper, Confederate General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson saw that part of the Union army - 12,000 men led by Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks - had become isolated here beside Cedar Mountain. Jackson took the opportunity to attack. On the blistering hot afternoon of August 9 the armies clashed in a mismanaged battle, but in the end, Jackson's 24,000 soldiers prevailed. As the battle subsided in the twilight, Confederates learned that Pope's army had been reinforced by the arrival of troops under Gen. Irvin McDowell. Though Jackson had won the battle, he had little choice but to retreat. Soon Robert E. Lee's entire Confederate Army of Northern Virginia gathered at Clark's Mountain, visible in the distance to your right, to launch the campaign that ended in the Second Battle of Manassas, August 28-30, where Jackson once again defeated Pope.

Help Preserve Battlefields, Call CWPT at 1-888-606-1400

Friends of Fredericksburg Area Battlefields - www.fofab.org

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s)
Civil War Preservation Trust image. Click for more information.
By Craig Swain
2. Civil War Preservation Trust
and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.

 
Erected by Civil War Preservation Trust
Friends of Fredericksburg Area Battlefields.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Battlefield Trails - Civil War marker series.
 
Location. 38° 24.309′ N, 78° 4.113′ W. Marker is near Culpeper, Virginia, in Culpeper County. Marker is at the intersection of General Winder Road (County Route 657) and James Madison Highway (U.S. 15), on the right when traveling west on General Winder Road. Touch for map. Located at the pull-off and trail head for the Civil War Preservation Trust's Cedar Mountain Battlefield walking trail. Marker is in this post office area: Culpeper VA 22701, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Cedar Mountain (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Cedar Mountain (a few steps from this marker); Hand-to-Hand Fighting (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Cedar Mountain (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Cedar Mountain
Second Manassas Campaign Map image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
3. Second Manassas Campaign Map
Key to map:
1. General Stonewall Jackson's Confederate army defeats General Nathaniel Banks' Federals at the Battle of Cedar Mountain on August 9. 2. Jackson retired south on August 11 after learning of the Union army converging on Culpeper. 3. General Robert E. Lee orders the rest of his army toward Gordonsville on August 13 and 4. consolidates his forces at Clark's Mountain on August 16. 5. General John Pope realizes that the Confederates are concentrating in his front and withdraws from Culpeper to a position along the Rappahannock River on August 18. 6. On August 27, Pope discovers Jackson in his rear and concentrates the Union army on Manassas Junction and 7. setting the stage for the Second Battle of Manassas on August 18 through 30.
(within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Cedar Mountain (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named The Battle of Cedar Mountain (about 600 feet away); a different marker also named The Battle of Cedar Mountain (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Culpeper.
 
More about this marker. On the lower left is a portrait of "Union Major General John Pope" who "led the newly formed Army of Virginia during the summer of 1862." In the upper center is a portrait of Confederate General "Stonewall" Jackson. A Second Manassas Campaign map is on the right side of the marker with important phases of the operation highlighted.
 
Regarding The Battle of Cedar Mountain. This is one of several markers interpreting the Battle of Cedar Mountain. See the Battle of Cedar Mountain Virtual Tour by Markers linked below.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. A Virtual Tour by Markers of the Battle of Cedar Mountain
 
Also see . . .
Several Markers at the Cedar Mountain Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
4. Several Markers at the Cedar Mountain Battlefield
Perhaps is it possible to have too many markers designating a Civil War site.
1. Battle of Cedar Mountain. National Park Service summary of the battle and driving tour. The marker is at the first tour stop. (Submitted on December 31, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Friends of the Fredericksburg Area Battlefields. The current home page for the FOFAB. The URL listed on the marker is now invalid. (Submitted on December 31, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Animated Overview of the Second Manassas Campaign. An excellent visual guide through the campaign leading up to the battle of Second Masassas. The action described on the marker is part of the early phases of this campaign. (Submitted on January 1, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

4. Battle of Cedar Mountain Virtual Tour by Markers. A set of markers that document the Battle of Cedar Mountain, August 9, 1862. (Submitted on January 1, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
The Battle of Cedar Mountain<br>The Walking Trail image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
5. The Battle of Cedar Mountain
The Walking Trail
Standing nearby at the bend of General Winder Road, is the trail head for the Cedar Mountain trail:

Welcome to the Civil War Preservation Trust's Cedar Mountain Battlefield! The battlefield walking trail is a half-mile loop that takes you past four wayside signs interpreting the 1862 battle and offers you a beautiful view across open fields to Cedar Mountain itself. Allow 45 minutes to walk the trail. You may also choose to walk an extra three quarters of a mile to the position on the field where the veterans of the 3rd Wisconsin placed a monument to their fallen comrades.

The trail is surfaced with mown grass, so be careful of the irregular surface and watch for snakes. Please do not stray from the trail as, at times, it takes you very near CWPT's property line. Be respectful of private property and do not trespass.

Most importantly, please enjoy your time in these beautiful fields and reflect that this experience would have been significantly different if this land had been paved over to build a shopping mall or subdivision. To help CWPT preserve other battlefields like Cedar Mountain, please call 1-800-606-1400.
Trail Map image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
6. Trail Map
The start of the trail (indicated by the "you are here" star) is the approximate location of Crittenden Gate, at the bend in General Winder Road (CR 657). Note also the roadbed for the original Orange and Culpeper ran parallel to the modern day James Madison Highway (US. 15) at this point, and is shown with a dashed brown line on the map extending to the north (top of map). Crittenden Lane ran from the bend in the road, along modern CR 657, to the south towards Cedar Mountain.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 31, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,104 times since then and 58 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on December 31, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on March 30, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on December 31, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on December 30, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5, 6. submitted on January 1, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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