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Hagerstown in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Washington Confederate Cemetery

 
 
Washington Confederate Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2011
1. Washington Confederate Cemetery Marker
Inscription. Immediately after the Civil War, Union casualties in the Frederick-Washington County areas were re-interred at a new National Cemetery at Sharpsburg. Yet no provisions were made to provide decent burial for thousands of hastily-buried Confederates. To address this problem, the State of Maryland chartered the Washington Confederate Cemetery in 1870 and authorized funds to collect and bury the Confederates in one place. In 1872, the Board of Trustees of the Cemetery, led by Hagerstonian and former Confederate officer Colonel Henry Kyd Douglas purchased 2.75 acres from Rose Hill Cemetery and took the next three years to collect the rebel soldiers.These grounds are hallowed with the remains of approximately 346 identified and 2,122 unknown Confederate servicemen who perished in the Antietam, Gettysburg and Monocacy campaigns.
The Cemetery was formally dedicated on June 15, 1877. The keynote speaker was former Confederate General Fitzhugh Lee.
In September, 1961, former President Dwight D. Eisenhower and General Ulysses S. Grant III rededicated Washington Confederate Cemetery in a large ceremony commemorating the centennial anniversary of the Civil War (1961-1965)

(Left picture)
President Dwight D. Eisenhower, speaking at the 1961 rededication of the cemetery.Washington County Historical Society

(Left
President Dwight D. Eisenhower, speaking at the 1961 rededication image. Click for full size.
By Marker
2. President Dwight D. Eisenhower, speaking at the 1961 rededication
center picture)

Col. Isaac E. Avery, 6th North Carolina State Troops (1826-1863) Richard Clem
At Gettysburg, Avery commanded Hoke's Brigade in an assault on Cemetery Hill late in the evening of July 2,1863. Mortally wounded in the assault, he broke off a nearby twig and wrote the following note in his own blood to his second-in-command: "Major: Tell my father that I died with my face to the enemy." Col Avery soon passed and his servent Elijah attempted to return the remains to North Carolina for burial. However, hot and foul weather, road conditions and the movements of the armies delayed his efforts and Elijah made it only as far as Williamsport where the Colonel had to be buried.After the war, Avery was re-interred here. The note is today held in the collection of the North Carolina State Archives.

(Right upper picture)
Former Confederate General Fitzhugh Lee, center, on gray horse. This photo was taken in Havana, Cuba in 1898 while he served as a major general in the U.S. Volunteers during the Spanish-American War. Stephen R. Bockmiller

(Right lower picture)
Col. Samuel P. Lumpkin, 44th Georgia Infantry (1833-1863) Steven Stotelmyer
Col. Lumpkin was wounded in the leg by artillery fire on the first day of the Battle of Gettysburg. His leg amputated, he was transported in the "long wagon
Left center picture, Col. Isaac E. Avery, image. Click for full size.
By Marker
3. Left center picture, Col. Isaac E. Avery,
train of misery" in the Confederate retreat toward Virginia. Unable to go any further, Lumpkin was left in Hagerstown by the retreating army and fell into Union hands. In September, he died in Hagerstown of typhoid. Originally buried in the Presbyterian Church Cemetery, he was moved here in 1913.
 
Erected by Heart of the Civil War Maryland Heritage Area.
 
Location. 39° 37.738′ N, 77° 43.514′ W. Marker is in Hagerstown, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on outh Potomac Street (Maryland Route 65), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Located between Spruce Street and Garlinger Avenue. Marker is in this post office area: Hagerstown MD 21740, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Washington Confederate Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); Thomas Kennedy (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Rose Hill Cemetery (approx. 0.2 miles away); Willow Lane Park (approx. mile away); Great Indian Warrior/Trading Path (approx. 0.7 miles away); Elliott-Bester House (approx. 0.7 miles away); Jonathan Hager House (approx. 0.8 miles away); Hager House and Museum (approx. 0.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hagerstown.
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil
 
Right upper picture, Former Confederate General Fitzhugh Lee, center, on gray horse image. Click for full size.
By Marker
4. Right upper picture, Former Confederate General Fitzhugh Lee, center, on gray horse
Right lower picture, Col. Samuel P. Lumpkin, 44th Georgia Infantry image. Click for full size.
By Washington Confederate Cemetery Marker
5. Right lower picture, Col. Samuel P. Lumpkin, 44th Georgia Infantry
Washington Confederate Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 17, 2011
6. Washington Confederate Cemetery Marker
Washington Confederate Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 17, 2011
7. Washington Confederate Cemetery
Washington Confederate Cemetery Boundry Marker with the Maryland Crest image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 17, 2011
8. Washington Confederate Cemetery Boundry Marker with the Maryland Crest
Washington Confederate Cemetery and Confederate Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 17, 2011
9. Washington Confederate Cemetery and Confederate Memorial
Washington Confederate Memorial, * See nearby markers image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 17, 2011
10. Washington Confederate Memorial, * See nearby markers
The State of Maryland has provided this cemetery, and erected this monument, to perpetuate the memory of the Confederate dead, who fell in the Battles of Antietam and South Mountain.
The State of Virginia, has contributed toward the burial of her dead, in this cemetery.
The State of West Virginia, has contributed toward the burial of her dead, in this cemetery.
Erected by State of Maryland.
Washington Confederate Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 17, 2011
11. Washington Confederate Memorial
Washington Confederate Cemetery Marker, seen looking north along South Potomac Street image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 17, 2011
12. Washington Confederate Cemetery Marker, seen looking north along South Potomac Street
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 23, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 971 times since then and 47 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12. submitted on July 23, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.
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