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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Dover in Kent County, Delaware — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

An Army of Restoration (CCC)

 
 
An Army of Restoration Marker image. Click for full size.
By Roger Dean Meyer, October 9, 2006
1. An Army of Restoration Marker
Inscription. To provide employment and vocational training for youthful citizens of the United States…through the performance of useful public work in connection with the conservation and development of the natural resources of the United States and its possessions. (CCC Federal Enacting Legislation, 1933) During the dark days of the Great Depression, the Civilian Conservation Corps conserved some of America’s most precious natural resources—its land and young men. Between 1933 and 1942, this center-piece of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal legislation put to work hundreds of thousands of unemployed and underprivileged youth. As many as 7,000 Delawareans between the ages of 18 and 25 were employed by the CCC nationwide. Whether fighting forest fires in Oregon, building the Appalachian Trail, planting trees in Virginia, or draining swamps in southern Delaware, the CCC harnessed youthful energies for purposeful work. In addition to native Delawareans, many men from New Jersey and New York were assigned to the First State’s six (on the average) CCC camps. In Delaware, the Corps undertook mosquito control work along the marshes and inland bays to improve the quality of life for all Delawareans. The CCC also cleared and maintained more than 12 million yards of drainage and flood control ditches statewide. The Corps helped create
An Army of Restoration (CCC) Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, October 17, 2012
2. An Army of Restoration (CCC) Marker
a national wildlife refuge out of the wetlands of Bombay Hook. Other CCC projects restored freshwater lakes and ponds, planted new forests, blazed trails and created fire breaks’. Indeed, the young men of the Civilian Conservation Corps earned more than a day’s wage for a day’s work. They earned self-respect and a sense of purpose. They also earned a very special place in the history of Delaware and the nation.
 
Erected 1987 by First State Chapter of the National Association of Civilian Conservation Corps Alumni, 133rd General Assembly—Delaware Legislature, Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Civilian Conservation Corps marker series.
 
Location. 39° 9.369′ N, 75° 31.364′ W. Marker is in Dover, Delaware, in Kent County. Marker can be reached from The Green, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Located next to 55 The Green. Marker is in this post office area: Dover DE 19901, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. John Bell House (within shouting distance of this marker); State House (within shouting distance of this marker); The Delaware Line (within shouting distance of this marker); Kent County Courthouses (1680-1983) (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of King George’s Tavern (within shouting distance of this marker); Ridgely House (within shouting distance of this marker); Loockerman House (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); In the Council Chamber of Elizabeth Battell's Golden Fleece Tavern (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Dover.
 
Also see . . .  Roosevelt’s Tree Army, Civilian Conservation Corps Alumni. (Submitted on January 3, 2008, by Roger Dean Meyer of Yankton, South Dakota.)
 
Categories. Horticulture & Forestry
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 3, 2008, by Roger Dean Meyer of Yankton, South Dakota. This page has been viewed 1,853 times since then and 54 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on January 3, 2008, by Roger Dean Meyer of Yankton, South Dakota.   2. submitted on November 24, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.
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