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Hagerstown in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Hagerstonians In The Civil War

Congressman James Dixon Roman 1809-1867

 
 
Hagerstonians In The Civil War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2011
1. Hagerstonians In The Civil War Marker
Inscription. This building was Congressman Roman's home from the time he purchased it in 1845 until his death in 1867. A prominent member of the Whig Party, Roman was elected to the House of Representatives during the 30th Congress (1847-1849). He declined nomination for election to a second term. One of the more influential members of the House, he regularly associated with many senators, including Henry Clay and Daniel Webster, He was a presidential elector in 1849 for the Taylor/Fillmore ticket, and again in 1857 for Buchannan/Breckinridge ticket.

In the Spring of 1861, Roman served as a Maryland representative to a "Peace Convention" that was assembled at Washington's Willard Hotel in the hopes of avoiding the coming Civil War through a negotiated settlement. While strongly pro Union, he was against forcing seceding states to stay in the Union. In July, 1864, as President of the Hagerstown Bank, Roman was asked by the City to coordinate efforts to collect and pay the $20,000 ransom levied on the City by Confederate General McCausland.Seriously ill at the time, Roman walked to the Courthouse (one-half block east) and settled the payment with the Confederate leaders to save the city from threatened destruction.

[ Picture included: Congressman James Dixon Roman]
Among Giants - Roman and the 30th Congress
The 30th Congress
Congressman James Dixon Roman image. Click for full size.
Hagerstonians In The Civil War Marker
2. Congressman James Dixon Roman
(1847-49) was one of the more contentious and important conducted in the nation's history. Great issues regarding the westward expansion of the territories, how slavery would be treated in those territories, and the controversial Mexican-American War were the primary issues of the time. At this time, the House of Representatives had its "old lions", but it also served as an incubator for young leaders who would one day lead the north and south through the Civil War. Other members included: [With pictures, Courtesy of the Library of Congress]
Rep.Alexander H. Stephens of Georgia - Vice President of the Confederacy
Rep. Howell Cobb of Georgia - Speaker of the Provisional Confederate Congress and Major General in the Confederate Army
Rep. John Quincy Adams of Massachusetts - formerly 6th President of the United States
Rep. Robert Barnwell Rhett of South Carolina - Prominent Leader of South Carolina Secession Convention
Rep. Abraham Lincoln of Illinois - future 16th President of the United States
Rep. Horace Greeley of New York - Abolitionist and Editor of the New York Tribune
 
Erected by Maryland Heritage Area.
 
Location. 39° 38.627′ N, 77° 43.426′ W. Marker is in Hagerstown, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on West Washington
Hagerstonians In The Civil War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 17, 2011
3. Hagerstonians In The Civil War Marker
Rep.Alexander H. Stephens of Georgia - Vice President of the Confederacy
Rep. Howell Cobb of Georgia - Speaker of the Provisional Confederate Congress and Major General in the Confederate Army
Rep. John Quincy Adams of Massachusetts - formerly 6th President of the United States
Rep. Robert Barnwell Rhett of South Carolina - Prominent Leader of South Carolina Secession Convention
Rep. Abraham Lincoln of Illinois - future 16th President of the United States
Rep. Horace Greeley of New York - Abolitionist and Editor of the New York Tribune
Street (Maryland Route 40), on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Located between South Prospect Street and Summit Avenue. Marker is in this post office area: Hagerstown MD 21740, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Treatment of the Wounded (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Hagerstonians In The Civil War (within shouting distance of this marker); Hagerstonians in the Civil War (within shouting distance of this marker); Mount Prospect (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Crossroads of History (about 400 feet away); Ransom of Hagerstown (about 400 feet away); Bench Mark "A" (about 400 feet away); For God and Country (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hagerstown.
 
Regarding Hagerstonians In The Civil War. James Dixon Roman US Congressman, After studying law, he was admitted to the bar in 1834 and established a practice in Hagerstown, Maryland. Elected as a Whig to Congress in 1846, he served a single term, from 1847 to 1849. He returned to Hagerstown and was president of the Old Hagerstown Bank from 1851 until his death in 1867. He was a member of the peace convention held in Washington, D. C., in 1861 in an effort to devise means to prevent the impending war.
 
Also see . . .
Hagerstonians In The Civil War Marker, left of steps image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 17, 2011
4. Hagerstonians In The Civil War Marker, left of steps
This building was Congressman Roman's home from the time he purchased it in 1845 until his death in 1867.
 Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. James Dixon Roman ... (Submitted on July 29, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. PoliticsWar, US Civil
 
Hagerstonians In The Civil War Marker (L) looking along West Washington Street (U.S. 40) image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 17, 2011
5. Hagerstonians In The Civil War Marker (L) looking along West Washington Street (U.S. 40)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 29, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 491 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on July 29, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.
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