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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Grand Island in Hall County, Nebraska — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

The Pawnee: Prairie Town Builders, Pawnee History

 
 
The Pawnee: Prairie Town Builders, Pawnee History Marker image. Click for full size.
By Charles T. Harrell, June 29, 2011
1. The Pawnee: Prairie Town Builders, Pawnee History Marker
Inscription. The Pawnee: Prairie Town Builders, Pawnee History The Pawnee migrated from the Southwest and lived in the Platte and Loup Village areas for more than seven centuries.

The Pawnee were the most influential and populous of the native peoples of Nebraska. They dwelt mainly in a group of “Permanent” but frequently moved earth-lodge villages around the confluence of the Platte and Loup Rivers in East Central Nebraska. Village sites are located from about fifteen miles below Fremont on the Platte to approximately one hundred twenty miles upstream to St. Paul on the Loup. In the early 1800ís, the Pawnee lived in five or six principal towns, each estimated to consist of forty to two hundred lodges containing from eight hundred to three thousand five-hundred inhabitants, and commonly fortified. Villages were the local point for their agricultural activities that included cultivation of corn, beans, squash, and pumpkins.

During the summer and winter bison hunting expeditions, the Pawnee ventured well into Western Nebraska and Northwestern Kansas.

The name Pawnee is thought to mean “a horn” and derived from Pakiki. This term was used to designate the peculiar manner of dressing the scalp-lock by stiffening the hair with paint and fat to make it stand erect and curved like a horn. Through all the difficulties

Pawnee Earthen Lodge image. Click for full size.
By Charles T. Harrell, June 29, 2011
2. Pawnee Earthen Lodge
Stuhr Museum of the Prairie Pioneer
of the 19th century, and white mans diseases, the Pawnee never made war against the U.S. The Pawnee gave many evidences of forbearance and Pawnee scouts served faithfully and courageously in the U.S. Army during Indian hostilities. The Last Pawnee tract was ceded in 1876 when tribes moved to Oklahoma.
 
Location. 40° 52.876′ N, 98° 22.509′ W. Marker is in Grand Island, Nebraska, in Hall County. Marker is at the intersection of Tech Ave. and U.S. 34 on Tech Ave.. Touch for map. Located at the mouth of the Pawnee Earthen Lodge at the Stuhr Museum of the Prairie Pioneer. Marker is in this post office area: Grand Island NE 68801, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Earth Lodge Design and Construction (here, next to this marker); Old California Overland Trail (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Mormon Trail (about 700 feet away); La Grande Isle (approx. 1.6 miles away); Original Home of the Stolley Family (approx. 1.6 miles away); Oldest Remaining School House (approx. 1.6 miles away); Grand Island Public School Bell (approx. 3.2 miles away); Pioneer Park (approx. 3.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Grand Island.
 
Categories. Native Americans
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 29, 2011, by Charles T. Harrell of Woodford, Virginia. This page has been viewed 577 times since then and 43 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 29, 2011, by Charles T. Harrell of Woodford, Virginia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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