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Tarboro in Edgecombe County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Civil War Cemeteries

Buried with Honor

 
 
Civil War Cemeteries Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2011
1. Civil War Cemeteries Marker
Inscription. Civil War soldiers and veterans are buried in Calvary Episcopal Churchyard and Old Town Cemetery. Among the fifty Confederates interred in the churchyard are Gen. William Dorsey Pender and Lt. Col. John L. Bridges. In May 1863, Pender led a brigade at the Battle of Chancellorsville,"bearing the colors of a regiment in his own hands up to and over the entrenchments, with the most distinguished gallantry." He was mortally wounded during the Battle of Gettysburg on July 2, 1863. Bridges, who died in 1884, commanded the Edgecombe Guards at the Battle of Big Bethel, Virginia, on June 10, 1861.

  Henry Toole Clark of Tarboro, North Carolina's governor from July 1861 to September 1862, is also buried in Calvary Episcopal Churchyard. He readied the state for war, assembling troops, gathering supplies, making critical alliances, and defending vital ports from early Union attacks.
  Construction began in 1859 on Calvary Church, one of the county's most important landmarks, but stopped during the war. The church was consecrated in 1868.
  Old Town Cemetery, surrounding Howard Memorial Presbyterian Church was created as a public burying ground in 1790. Union soldiers killed at the Daniel's Schoolhouse engagement in 1863 were buried there until their families claimed the remains after
left, Gen. William Dorsey Pender; right Gov. Henry Toole Clark image. Click for full size.
By Civil War Cemeteries Marker, `
2. left, Gen. William Dorsey Pender; right Gov. Henry Toole Clark
the war. The cemetery also contains marked and unmarked graves of the Confederate soldiers who died here in Confederate hospitals. The gateway arch on St. Davis Street honors them. Of the more than 1,400 Edgecombe County men who served in the Confederate army, many are buried in Tarboro (including 40 in Greenwood Cemetery on Howard Avenue), while others rest in family cemeteries throughout the county.
 
Erected by North Carolina Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the North Carolina Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 35° 53.925′ N, 77° 31.882′ W. Marker is in Tarboro, North Carolina, in Edgecombe County. Marker is at the intersection of East St. James Street and St. David Street, on the right when traveling east on East St. James Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Tarboro NC 27886, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Joseph Blount Chesire, Jr. (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); St. Paul A.M.E. Zion Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); John C. Dancy (approx. 0.2 miles away); W.D. Pender (approx. 0.2 miles away); W.L. Saunders
(Picture at right) image. Click for full size.
By Civil War Cemeteries Marker, `
3. (Picture at right)
Lt. Ivey Foreman (Dec. 20, 1843 Dec. 21, 1864) served on CSS Beaufort during the Battle of Hampton Rhodes on March 9,1862, between the ironclads CSS Virginia (formerly USS Merrimack and USS Monitor. He later served on other Confederate vessels. He is buried in Calvary Episcopal Churchyard.
(approx. 0.2 miles away); Henry T. Clark (approx. 0.2 miles away); George H. White (approx. ¼ mile away); U.S.S. Maine Memorial (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tarboro.
 
Also see . . .
1. Major General William Dorsey Pender- Angelfire entry. ...at twenty-nine was the youngest and the fastest-rising major general in the Army of Northern Virginia at Gettysburg...been placed at the head of "Powell" Hill's old Light Division, one of the two best divisions in the army. (Submitted on August 2, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. William Dorsey Pender grave, (and photo)- Find a Grave entry. Pender received a shrapnel wound in the leg. The leg became infected as he was being transported to Staunton, Virginia, which resulted in being amputated there, and he died subsequent to the operation, on July 18, 1863. (Submitted on August 2, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

3. The Battle of Big Bethel, From Wikipedia. was one of the earliest land battles of the American Civil War after the surrender of Fort Sumter. The battle between Union Army and Confederate States Army forces on June 10, 1861 took place in Hampton and York County, Virginia, (Submitted on August 2, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.)
Civil War Cemeteries Marker, seen along East St. James Street, image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 18, 2011
4. Civil War Cemeteries Marker, seen along East St. James Street,
with Cavalry Episcopal Churchyard in background
 

4. Henry Toole Clark - NCpedia entry. ...was the second of three chief executives to serve North Carolina during the Civil War. (Submitted on August 2, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

5. C.S.S. Beaufort. built at Wilmington, Del., in 1854, as CALEDONIA. After North Carolina seceded, was turned over to the Confederate States Navy (Submitted on August 2, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil
 
Old Town Cemetery as mentioned image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 18, 2011
5. Old Town Cemetery as mentioned
Old Town Cemetery
1790
Here are buried early
settlers and Veterans
of Tarboro and
Edgecombe County
Placed by the
Town of Tarboro
and the
Tarboro Rotary Club
Civil War Cemeteries Marker and Old Town Cemetery , as mentioned image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 18, 2011
6. Civil War Cemeteries Marker and Old Town Cemetery , as mentioned
Civil War Cemeteries Marker (distant) and the gateway arch on St. Davis Street, as mentioned image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 18, 2011
7. Civil War Cemeteries Marker (distant) and the gateway arch on St. Davis Street, as mentioned
Keystone reads:
1861
They wore
the grey
1865
C.S.A.
Old Town Cemetery Gateway arch image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 18, 2011
8. Old Town Cemetery Gateway arch
Erected by
The William Dorsey Pender
Chapter U.D.C.
October 1910
Tarboro N.C.
Old Town Cemetery, one such Confederate grave image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 18, 2011
9. Old Town Cemetery, one such Confederate grave
barely legible printing: Surgeon, Jones, Confederate States
Calvary Church yard as mentioned image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 18, 2011
10. Calvary Church yard as mentioned
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 2, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 818 times since then and 75 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on August 2, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.
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