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Boonsboro in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Deaths of Two Generals

“Hallo, Sam, Iím dead!”

 

óAntietam Campaign 1862 ó

 
Deaths of Two Generals Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 2, 2006
1. Deaths of Two Generals Marker
Inscription. The fight for Foxís Gap on September 14, 1862, claimed the lives of two generals, one from each side. Confederate Gen. Samuel Garland, a Lynchburg, Virginia native, attended the Virginia Military Institute at Lexington and later obtained his law degree. Married in 1856, he suffered tragedy early in the war when both his wife and four-year-old son died in an influenza epidemic. Grief-stricken, he left Lynchburg as captain of the Lynchburg Home Guard, excelled during the Peninsula Campaign and Seven Daysí Battles, and soon attained generalís rank. Charged with defending Foxís Gap, he fell mortally wounded by a bullet through his chest while rallying his men about ĺ of a mile south of here.

As evening fell and the Confederates fell back through the gap and off to the north, Union Gen. Jesse L. Reno rode by here and into the field across from Wiseís cabin to investigate what he believed was a delay in the push for Turnerís Gap. Just then, Gen. John Bell Hoodís Texans arrived on the field and fired the final Confederate volley, mortally wounding Reno. Carried on a stretcher to his friend Gen. Samuel D. Sturgisís headquarters, Reno called to him, “Hallo, Sam, Iím dead!” A few minutes later he died, the first Union Corps commander killed during the war. His monument is the second oldest one erected for the Maryland Campaign.
The Two Maryland Civil War Trails Markers image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 2, 2006
2. The Two Maryland Civil War Trails Markers
Also visible is the Near Here in Wiseís Field General Garland marker.

 
Erected by Maryland Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Maryland Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 39° 28.231′ N, 77° 37.043′ W. Marker is in Boonsboro, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on Reno Monument Road near the Appalachian Trail, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Boonsboro MD 21713, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Maryland Campaign of 1862 ( here, next to this marker); The Battle for Foxís Gap ( here, next to this marker); The Lost Orders ( here, next to this marker); Near Here in Wiseís Field ( a few steps from this marker); Stonewall Regiment ( within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Boonsboro.
 
More about this marker. Portraits of Garland and Reno are displayed on the lower left and right respectively. A photograph of the Monument to Gen. Reno, South Mountain Battlefield is in the upper right. In the upper left is a general map of the area with stars indicating nearby Civil War Trails sites.
 
Also see . . .
1. General Samuel Garland – Brave and Accomplished
Markers at Foxís Gap image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 10, 2005
3. Markers at Foxís Gap
Several markers are found at this location. The Deaths of Two Generals marker is seen here on the left.
. (Submitted on July 23, 2006.)
2. General Jesse Reno – Remember Reno. (Submitted on July 23, 2006.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Deaths of Two Generals Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, June 24, 2009
4. Deaths of Two Generals Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 23, 2006, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,252 times since then and 68 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 23, 2006, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   3. submitted on September 23, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4. submitted on August 9, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.
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