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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Madison in Morgan County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Antebellum Architecture

 
 
Antebellum Architecture Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, June 13, 2011
1. Antebellum Architecture Marker
Inscription. As the county gained more plantations, Madison attracted nearby planters desiring to shop, socialize, learn, and worship. Some planters also built in-town homes. Antebellum architecture reflected the shift from the early yeoman farmer society to a slave-based plantation economy, dominated by a handful of planters whose grand homes spoke of their status.

Antebellum architecture also marked the community’s growing prosperity as well as an interest in the newly fashionable Greek Revival architecture. Stylish homes were added and older homes updated throughout the city environs, building a reputation of a progressive and cultured town.

The Johnston-Jones-Manley House (c.1811) acquired its later Greek Revival façade during the 1840-1850s and was moved 200 feet to face S. Main Street in 1908, thus allowing the construction of the Methodist Church (1914). In 1977, a Manley heir donated the home to the Morgan County Historical Society, Inc., who manages it as a heritage tourism site-Heritage Hall, a house museum with period furnishings.
 
Erected 2011 by City of Madison, Madison BiCentennial Commission 1809-2009.
 
Location. 33° 35.633′ N, 83° 28.183′ W. Marker is in Madison, Georgia, in Morgan
Antebellum Architecture Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, June 13, 2011
2. Antebellum Architecture Marker
Looking southwest on South Main Street (US Highway 278)
County. Marker is at the intersection of South Main Street (U.S. 278) and Jones Alley, on the right when traveling west on South Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 277 South Main Street, Madison GA 30650, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Reconstruction Property Rights (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Foundation to Consolidation (approx. 0.2 miles away); Madison (approx. 0.2 miles away); Banking Institutions (approx. 0.2 miles away); Madison Historic Cemeteries (approx. 0.2 miles away); Early Religious Life (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Town Square (approx. 0.2 miles away); Freedom of Assembly (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Madison.
 
Also see . . .  Heritage Hall. (Submitted on August 7, 2011, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.)
 
Categories. Antebellum South, US
 
Antebellum Architecture Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, June 13, 2011
3. Antebellum Architecture Marker
Looking northeast on South Main Street (US Highway 278) past Jones Alley toward the town square.
Antebellum Architecture Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, June 13, 2011
4. Antebellum Architecture Marker
The marker with Heritage Hall in the background.
Heritage Hall image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, June 13, 2011
5. Heritage Hall
The Johnston-Jones-Manley House was built c.1811 by Dr. William Johnston. The Greek Revival facade was added in the 1840-1850s.
"Travelers Inn, Madison, Ga." image. Click for full size.
Unknown. Postcard from David Seibert Collection, September 5, 2011
6. "Travelers Inn, Madison, Ga."
A postcard from the Commercial Coldtype Company, Chicago, undated, number 62886. It was taken some time after 1923 when the home had been converted to a "Travellers Inn," with "Home Cooking" and "Cars Stored Free" according to signs in the yard. The home was sold to the Friends of Heritage Hall in 1977.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 6, 2011, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 677 times since then and 29 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 6, 2011, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   6. submitted on September 5, 2011, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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