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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Berlin in Hartford County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Berlin

 
 
Berlin Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, August 6, 2011
1. Berlin Marker
Inscription.
Berlin
This land, granted to settlers in 1661 and 1668 by the General Court of Connecticut, was also purchased from the local Mattabesett Indian tribe. Founders of the community include Sergeant Richard Beckley, who came north on the trail from New Haven before 1660 and built a home in the northeast section; Jonathan Gilbert, owner of a tract of land along the Hartford-New Haven path; and Captain Richard Seymour, who led a group of families from Farmington in 1686 to begin the settlement at Christian Lane. The area was named the Great Swamp Society in 1705, when it was granted a distinct ecclesiastical unit. Portions of Farmington, Wethersfield, and Middletown were included in the reorganization of 1722, when the name became Kensington. The Worthington Society was later separated from Kensington, but in 1785 all parts were incorporated as the Town of Berlin, including Worthington, Kensington, East Berlin and New Britain. Known as the "Town at the Crossroads" Berlin is the geographic center of Connecticut.

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Here in the birthplace of the Yankee Pedlar, the Pattison brothers started the tin industry in 1740, when they began manufacturing and selling tin pots and pans. Simeon North, official pistol maker for the United States Government, developed a system of standard interchangeable parts
Berlin Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, August 6, 2011
2. Berlin Marker
back
here in his shop c. 1800. Other citizens who brought fame to Berlin include: Emma Hart Willard, educator; Robert Brandegee, artist-poet; Elisha Cheney, clock maker; James Gates Percival, poet-geologist; and General Selah Hart, regimental and brigade commander in the American Revolutionary War. The period from 1850 to 1900 saw the New Britain section grow from a farming village to a thriving industrial center after its separation from Berlin in 1850. Some factories still operated in Berlin, however, and the brick industry flourished well into the 20th century because of the excellent quality of the local clay. The Berlin area has long been a major stop on the main routes of travel, from Indian paths, to superhighways.
Erected by the Town of Berlin
The Berlin Historical Society
And the Connecticut Historical Commission
1982
 
Erected 1982 by the Town of Berlin, The Berlin Historical Society, the Connecticut Historical Commission.
 
Location. 41° 38.015′ N, 72° 46.125′ W. Marker is in Berlin, Connecticut, in Hartford County. Marker is at the intersection of Kensington Road and Main Street, on the left when traveling north on Kensington Road. Touch for map. Located in Deming Park. Marker is in this post office area: Berlin CT 06037, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Berlin Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, August 6, 2011
3. Berlin Marker
At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. New Britain Vietnam Veterans Memorial (approx. one mile away); Joseph J. "Joe" Buzas (approx. one mile away); First Civil War Monument (approx. one mile away); New Britain Spanish-American War Memorial (approx. 1.1 miles away); VFW Post 511 Vietnam Veterans Memorial (approx. 1.1 miles away); Berlin Veterans Monument (approx. 1.4 miles away); To Elihu Burritt (approx. 2 miles away); Second Lt. Sherrod Emerson Skinner, Jr. (approx. 2.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Berlin.
 
Also see . . .
1. Welcome to the Town of Berlin. (Submitted on August 12, 2011, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
2. Berlin, Connecticut on Wikipedia. (Submitted on August 12, 2011, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
 
Categories. Colonial EraSettlements & Settlers
 
Berlin Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, August 6, 2011
4. Berlin Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 12, 2011, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 591 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 12, 2011, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.
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