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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Oxon Hill in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

John Hanson

Honored Patriot of the American Revolution

 

—Oxon Hill Manor —

 
John Hanson Marker - Panel 1, east face of oblisk image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 21, 2010
1. John Hanson Marker - Panel 1, east face of oblisk
Inscription.
[Panel 1:]
John Hanson
Honored Patriot of the American Revolution
[Picture of John Hanson and Seal of the "Sons of the American Revolution"]

[Panel 2:]
Born 3 April, 1721, Mullberry Grove, Charles Co., MD. Died 15 November 1783 at the original Oxon Hill Manor house (site about 400 yards north of here) Prince George's Co., MD.
John Hanson served several terms as a delegate to the Lower House of the Maryland Assembly from Charles County between 1757 and 1769, and as a ...

[Panel 3:]
member of the Maryland House of Delegates, representing Frederick County from 1778 to 1780. In 1775 he served as a member of the Maryland Convention which issued its famous declaration known as the "Association of the Freemen of Maryland." He was elected the first President of the United States in Congress

[Panel 4]
Assembled under the New Articles of Confederation and served from November 5, 1781 - November 4, 1782. While President he tendered George Washington the thanks of Congress for the victory at Yorktown.

Dedicated June 30, 1990 by the John Hanson Chapter, Maryland Society, Sons of the American Revolution.
 
Erected 1990 by John Hanson Chapter, Maryland Society, Sons of the American
John Hanson Marker - Panel 2, north face of oblisk image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 22, 2010
2. John Hanson Marker - Panel 2, north face of oblisk
Revolution.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Sons of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 38° 47.643′ N, 77° 0.331′ W. Marker is in Oxon Hill, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker is on Oxon Hill Road (Maryland Route 414) west of Indian Head Highway (Maryland Route 210). Touch for map. John Hanson monument is on the grass near the manor house, south of the estate parking area, approximately 0.1 mile from the estate entrance off Oxon Hill Road. Marker is at or near this postal address: 6701 Oxon Hill Road, Oxon Hill MD 20745, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Salubria Changed the Future of the Potomac Valley (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Judah and Resistance (about 700 feet away); Slavery in the Potomac Valley (about 700 feet away); Dr. John H. Bayne: A Leader In His Community (about 700 feet away); Emancipation in Maryland (about 800 feet away); Dr. John H. Bayne of Salubria “Prince of Horticulture” (approx. 0.2 miles away); Front Door to Maryland History (approx. ¼ mile away); "Salubria" (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Oxon Hill.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand
John Hanson Marker - Panel 3, west face of oblisk image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 22, 2010
3. John Hanson Marker - Panel 3, west face of oblisk
the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .  Oxon Hill Manor History. ... Hanson visited Oxon Hill Manor often and died there in 1783. He is believed to be buried on the estate's cemetery. The original mansion was destroyed by fire in 1895. ...The present 49-room Georgian style manor house was designed by Count Jules Henri de Sibour and built for Sumner Welles, Undersecretary of State in the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration. Roosevelt was a frequent visitor to the estate. (Submitted on May 22, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 
 
Additional keywords. Addison Plantation; Sumner Welles.
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesGovernmentPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Revolutionary
 
John Hanson Marker - Panel 4, north face of oblisk image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 22, 2010
4. John Hanson Marker - Panel 4, north face of oblisk
John Hanson MarkerJohn Hanson Marker - close up of the seal of the Sons of the American Revolution image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 22, 2010
5. John Hanson MarkerJohn Hanson Marker - close up of the seal of the Sons of the American Revolution
John Hanson Monument at Oxon Hill Manor image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 22, 2010
6. John Hanson Monument at Oxon Hill Manor
North entrance to the Oxon Hill Manor mansion house - near the John Hanson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 22, 2010
7. North entrance to the Oxon Hill Manor mansion house - near the John Hanson Marker
Oxon Hill Manor, north terrace of the mansion house image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 22, 2010
8. Oxon Hill Manor, north terrace of the mansion house
constructed in 1929 for Sumner Welles, Under Secy. of State.
View from the terrace toward the Potomac River - the National Harbor Gaylord Hotel visible at left image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 22, 2010
9. View from the terrace toward the Potomac River - the National Harbor Gaylord Hotel visible at left
Pres. John Hanson's lost gravesite may be found in the woodlands of the estate.
John Hanson image. Click for full size.
Internet Archive
10. John Hanson
This photo of the Charles Willson Peale portrait of John Hanson appeared in Herbert J. Stoekel's book, The strange story of John Hanson, First President of the United States: a guide to Oxon Hill Manor and Mulberry Grove in Maryland (Internet Archive).
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 22, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,341 times since then and 67 times this year. Last updated on August 12, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on May 22, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   10. submitted on April 26, 2016, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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