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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Port Orange in Volusia County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

From the Boardwalk

 
 
From the Boardwalk Marker image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, July 31, 2011
1. From the Boardwalk Marker
Inscription. Welcome to Dunlawton's boardwalk - a modern structure offering views of the former sugar factory while reducing foot traffic inside. (More on the nineteenth-century floorplan can be found in an interpretive panel near the ruins' south side.) Today's raised walk enters the sugar works through a passageway between two rooms:

To the right was the engine room. It enclosed a pair of steam boilers (one now gone); a horizontal steam engine; and a cane crusher, or mill, with engine-powered rollers and pan for catching juice. The coquina chimney created a draft for boiler fires.

To the left was a boiling room for processing cane juice. Its chimney provided a fire draft under two lines of kettles. After removing impurities at the start of the kettle trains, workers transferred the gradually thickening liquid from one kettle to another - then into wooden cooling troughs. The crystallized sugar was packed in barrels and drained in the purgery, or drying room.

What was it like at Dunlawton's sugar factory? Smoke-filled, busy, and loud. A pall hung over the site as smashed, dried cane stalks fueled the fires. Slaves fed new stalks into the crusher, hoping not to catch their hands. And the ground shook for hundreds of yards around as the giant machine rattled and banged. No wonder the plantation's
From the Boardwalk Marker image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, July 31, 2011
2. From the Boardwalk Marker
The factory's cane crusher looms in the background
owners lived near the Halifax River, away from the operation.
 
Erected by Volusia County and the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Historical Resources, assisted by the Florida Historical Commission.
 
Location. 29° 8.475′ N, 81° 0.343′ W. Marker is in Port Orange, Florida, in Volusia County. Marker can be reached from Old Sugar Mill Road east of Herbert Street, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. The marker is on the grounds of the Dunlawton Sugar Mill Botanical Gardens, mounted along the boardwalk at the sugar mill ruins. Marker is at or near this postal address: 950 Old Sugar Mill Road, Port Orange FL 32129, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Most Dangerous Chieftain (here, next to this marker); Telling Dunlawton's Stories (here, next to this marker); Working (a few steps from this marker); Sugar Making (a few steps from this marker); The Roof (a few steps from this marker); Dunlawton's Building Blocks (a few steps from this marker); Living on the Edge (a few steps from this marker); The Dunlawton Sugar Factory (a few steps from this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Port Orange.
 
More about this marker. The marker features
From the Boardwalk Marker image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, July 31, 2011
3. From the Boardwalk Marker
The marker overlooks the engine room.
a photo of one of the factory's chimneys, a diagram of a cane crusher, and illustrations of factory workers and/or slaves.

The marker features the logos of Volusia County and the Florida Heritage program.
 
Regarding From the Boardwalk. The site was listed with the National Register of Historic Places in 1973 under the name Dunlawton Plantation--Sugar Mill Ruins (# 73000606).
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the story of the Dunlawton Plantation and Sugar Mill Ruins, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Categories. AgricultureIndustry & Commerce
 
Dunlawton Boardwalk Entrance image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, August 14, 2010
4. Dunlawton Boardwalk Entrance
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 26, 2011, by Glenn Sheffield of Tampa, Florida. This page has been viewed 336 times since then and 33 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on August 26, 2011, by Glenn Sheffield of Tampa, Florida.   2, 3, 4. submitted on August 27, 2011, by Glenn Sheffield of Tampa, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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