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Near Daviston in Tallapoosa County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

A Bloody Contest

Horseshoe Bend National Military Park

 
 
A Bloody Contest Marker image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, June 16, 2011
1. A Bloody Contest Marker
Inscription.
Any officer or soldiers who flies before the enemy-shall suffer death.

With these harsh words, Maj. Gen. Andrew Jackson marched his soldiers 52 miles from the Coosa River to Horseshoe Bend and a bloody contest with the Red Sticks. His battle map shows how he positioned his troops early that Sunday morning, March 27, 1814.

In the field before you-in 1814 a forest of pine, oak, and hickory-Jackson's troops prepared for battle. A half mile ahead stood a log barricade, with the Red Sticks behind it awaiting Jackson's advance. The barricade, built by the Red Sticks, sealed off the horseshoe bend in the Tallapoosa River and protected their village, Tohopeka, which included 350 women and children.

The war started in 1813 as a civil war within the Creek confederation of towns. A portion of the population, known as Red Sticks, rebelled against the Creek national council, a group generally seeking to accommodate rather than challenge American expansion. The Creek civil war quickly developed into a large conflict involving Georgia, Tennessee, and the Mississippi Territory.

As Maj. Gen. Andrew Jackson pushed south with his Tennessee army, Red Sticks from several towns sought refuge here at Horseshoe Bend. Jackson, determined to succeed where previous campaigns had been indecisive, marched his
A Bloody Contest Marker (Left Face) image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, June 16, 2011
2. A Bloody Contest Marker (Left Face)
soldiers two and half days through the forest to this ground.
 
Erected by National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 32° 58.8′ N, 85° 44.024′ W. Marker is near Daviston, Alabama, in Tallapoosa County. Marker can be reached from Battlefield Park Tour Road, on the left. Touch for map. Marker is located about 150 yards above the Overlook Parking area on the grounds of Horseshoe Bend National Military Park along the Battlefield Park Road. Marker is at or near this postal address: 11288 Horseshoe Bend Road, Daviston AL 36256, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Horseshoe Bend National Military Park (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Horseshoe Bend Campaign Combatants (approx. 0.2 miles away); Tecumseh and the Prophets (approx. 0.2 miles away but has been reported missing); Gun Hill (approx. 0.3 miles away); Horseshoe Bend Battleground Monument (approx. 0.3 miles away); Futile Escape (approx. 0.3 miles away); Major Lemuel P. Montgomery (approx. 0.3 miles away); Jackson Trace (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Daviston.
 
Also see . . .
1. Horseshoe Bend National Military Park. (Submitted on August 19, 2011, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.)
A Bloody Contest (Right Face) image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, June 16, 2011
3. A Bloody Contest (Right Face)
Image Left:
Menawa, known as the Great Warrior, was the principal Red Stick war leader during the battle.

Image Right:
Andrew Jackson's victory at Horseshoe Bend led to national fame, and ultimately, the Presidency.

2. Encyclopedia of Alabama - Battle of Horseshoe Bend. (Submitted on August 19, 2011, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Native AmericansWars, US Indian
 
(Center) Jackson's Battle Map image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, June 16, 2011
4. (Center) Jackson's Battle Map
Jackson's map of Horseshoe Bend, which he prepared for his official report after the battle, shows the Tallapoosa River, the Red Sticks' village of Tohopeka, and their protective barricade.


1: Coffee's Cavalry
2: Cherokees
3: Indian Village
4: High Grounds
5: Breast Works
6: Loland
7: Advanced guard
8: Hill and Artillery
9: Regulars
10: Waggpon Pack Borres and wounded in center
11: Col. Copeland
12: E. Ten. Militia
13: Col. Cheatham
14: Rear Guard
A Bloody Contest Marker Overlooking The Battlefield. image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, June 16, 2011
5. A Bloody Contest Marker Overlooking The Battlefield.
Horseshoe Bend Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, June 16, 2011
6. Horseshoe Bend Battlefield
Andrew Jackson’s army arrived here about 10 a.m. on March 27, 1814. Brig. Gen. John Coffee’s mounted infantry and Indian allies crossed the Tallapoosa about three miles downstream and encircled the “horseshoe” so the Red Sticks could not get help from other towns or escape by swimming the river. Jackson deployed his own militia and regulars across the field and placed his artillery on the hill to your right. Straight ahead, behind their log barricade (marked by the line of white stakes), 1,000 Red Stick warriors awaited Jackson’s attack.

From Horseshoe Bend National Military Park Map and Guide Brochure
Horseshoe Bend Battlefield viewed from the Overlook image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, June 16, 2011
7. Horseshoe Bend Battlefield viewed from the Overlook
To the right of the lone tree in center of photo is the hill where Jackson position his artillery. The area to the left of the tree to the tree line was the location of the log barricade.
Position of the Red Sticks log barricade image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, June 16, 2011
8. Position of the Red Sticks log barricade
Jackson's Artillery Position image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, June 16, 2011
9. Jackson's Artillery Position
The View from Jackson's Artillery Position image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, June 16, 2011
10. The View from Jackson's Artillery Position
Opposite view from behind the log barricade image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, June 16, 2011
11. Opposite view from behind the log barricade
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 19, 2011, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. This page has been viewed 707 times since then and 47 times this year. Last updated on August 30, 2011, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on August 19, 2011, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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