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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Tignall in Wilkes County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Clarke’s Creek Encampment

 
 
Clarke’s Creek Encampment Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 3, 2011
1. Clarke’s Creek Encampment Marker
Inscription.
At Clarke’s Creek, near here, on the night of February 13, 1779, American troops commanded by Col. Elijah Clark, Col. John Dooley and Col. Andrew Pickens, encamped. Very early the next morning, they launched a surprise attack on the British forces under Colonel Boyd, encamped at Kettle Creek, four miles away. The victory prevented the British troops from joining the notorious McGirth, and broke their devastating march through Georgia.
 
Erected 1958 by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker Number 157-22.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 33° 53.415′ N, 82° 50.751′ W. Marker is near Tignall, Georgia, in Wilkes County. Marker is at the intersection of Mallorysville Road (County Route 106) and Dunkhill Road (County Route 105), on the right when traveling west on Mallorysville Road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Tignall GA 30668, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Independence United Methodist Church (approx. 6 miles away); Governor Mathews' Homesite (approx. 7.2 miles away); Rock Methodist Church Wilkes County
Clarke’s Creek Encampment Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 19, 2014
2. Clarke’s Creek Encampment Marker
(approx. 7.7 miles away); Nancy Hart (approx. 7.9 miles away); Walnut Hill Academy (approx. 8.5 miles away); The Rev. John Springer (approx. 8.5 miles away); Pope’s Chapel United Methodist Church (approx. 8.8 miles away); Fishing Creek Baptist Church (approx. 9.5 miles away); First Court North of Augusta (approx. 9.8 miles away); Heard's Fort (approx. 10 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tignall.
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Kettle Creek. The Battle of Kettle Creek (February 14, 1779) was a major encounter in the back country of Georgia during the American Revolutionary War. It was fought in Wilkes County about eight miles from present-day Washington, Georgia. A militia force of Patriots decisively defeated and scattered a Loyalist militia force that was on its way to British-controlled Augusta. (Submitted on December 7, 2014, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Elijah Clarke. Elijah Clarke (1742 – December 15, 1799), born in 1742 at Anson County, North Carolina, was an officer of
Clarke’s Creek Encampment Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 3, 2011
3. Clarke’s Creek Encampment Marker
the Georgia Militia and hero in the American Revolutionary War. He fought in the southern theater and in the Battle of Kettle Creek. (Submitted on December 7, 2014, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. John Dooly. Colonel John Dooly (1740–1780), born in Wilkes County, North Carolina, was an American Revolutionary war hero. He commanded a regiment at the Battle of Kettle Creek in 1779 and was killed at his home by Tories in 1780. (Submitted on December 7, 2014, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Andrew Pickens. Andrew Pickens (September 13, 1739 – August 11, 1817) was a militia leader in the American Revolution and a member of the United States House of Representatives from South Carolina. (Submitted on December 7, 2014, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Biographical Sketch of Daniel McGirt. Within the present limits of Kershaw County was born, about the middle of the eighteenth century, a doubtful hero, Daniel McGirtt, one of the most picturesque figures of the Revolution. He was a savage Tory outlaw, another “Terror of Loch Lomond’s side,” whose career might well adorn a highly colored page of Scottish Border fiction. (Submitted on December 7, 2014, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
Clarke’s Creek Encampment Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 3, 2011
4. Clarke’s Creek Encampment Marker
Clarke’s Creek Encampment Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 3, 2011
5. Clarke’s Creek Encampment Marker
Looking south across Mallorysville Road at Newtown Road. This is the route the American forces would have followed to the Kettle Creek Battlefield.
Clarke’s Creek Encampment Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 3, 2011
6. Clarke’s Creek Encampment Marker
Looking west on Mallorysville Road
Elijah Clark image. Click for full size.
By Rembrandt Peale
7. Elijah Clark
Andrew Pickens image. Click for full size.
By Thomas Sully
8. Andrew Pickens
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 4, 2011, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 421 times since then and 40 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on September 4, 2011, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   2. submitted on December 7, 2014, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on September 4, 2011, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   7, 8. submitted on December 7, 2014, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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