Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New Franklin in Howard County, Missouri — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

The New Franklin Viaduct

 
 
The New Franklin Viaduct Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., April 11, 2011
1. The New Franklin Viaduct Marker
Inscription.
The Need
When the Missouri, Kansas and Texas (MKT) Railroad established a division in Franklin, Mo., a switching yard was located south of New Franklin. This switching yard contained seven sets of tracks plus the through line. Missouri Highway 5 entered New Franklin by crossing this switching yard. There were several fatal accidents in the area before the viaduct was constructed.

Construction
The 1936 federal highway aid bill funded the viaduct and made reducing railroad grade crossings a high priority. A concrete deck girder design was the cheapest way to build the viaduct. The structure includes an unusual amount of architectual detailing because of the importance of the crossing and its location between Boonville and Fayette.

Carrothers and Crouch of Kansas City built the viaduct in 1939 and 1940. They used local labor, keeping unemployment in the community down during construction. The official dedication was part of an all-day celebration.

After the MKT
The MKT Railroad removed the switching yard after they stopped running in 1986. Katy Trail State Park replaced the through line. Missouri Department of Transportation discussed removing the viaduct as early as 1993 because it was not needed.

The Parkway
The Missouri Department of Transportation
The New Franklin Viaduct Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., April 11, 2011
2. The New Franklin Viaduct Marker
decided to remove the viaduct in 2009 and replace it with a parkway. A part of the railing became a decorative feature for Katy Trail State Park. More than half of the remaining structure provided recycling material for the at-grade parkway, which replaced the viaduct, rather than going to a landfill.
 
Erected by Missouri Dept of Natural Resources, MoDOT, and US DOT.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Katy Trail State Park marker series.
 
Location. 39° 0.748′ N, 92° 44.251′ W. Marker is in New Franklin, Missouri, in Howard County. Marker is at the intersection of Missouri Street (Missouri Route 5) and Katy Trail State Park, on the left when traveling south on Missouri Street. Touch for map. Marker is at Katy Trail State Park Milepost 188.3. Marker is in this post office area: New Franklin MO 65274, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Santa Fe Trail (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); History of New Franklin (about 500 feet away); KATY Caboose #127 (approx. 0.3 miles away); Franklin (approx. 0.3 miles away); Santa Fe Trail Marker (approx. 0.3 miles
The New Franklin Viaduct Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., April 11, 2011
3. The New Franklin Viaduct Marker
Looking south along Missouri Street
away); Franklin and New Franklin (approx. 0.3 miles away); End of Boone's Lick Trail (approx. 0.3 miles away); City of Trails (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New Franklin.
 
Also see . . .
1. Katy Trail State Park. (Submitted on September 7, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. Katy Railroad Historical Society. (Submitted on September 7, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. MKT Railroad History Along the Katy Trail. (Submitted on September 7, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Railroads & StreetcarsRoads & Vehicles
 
The New Franklin Viaduct Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., April 11, 2011
4. The New Franklin Viaduct Marker
Looking north along Missouri Street
Photo on The New Franklin Viaduct Marker image. Click for full size.
By Randall Dawdy, MoDOT, undated
5. Photo on The New Franklin Viaduct Marker
[Caption reads] The viaduct had a sidewalk, accessed by grand staircases on either side of the rail yard, which allowed pedestrians to cross the rail yard.
Photo on The New Franklin Viaduct Marker image. Click for full size.
By Randall Dawdy, MoDOT, undated
6. Photo on The New Franklin Viaduct Marker
[Caption reads] The detailing on the viaduct avoided sharp edges and flat surfaces common on bridges, and was often discussed in local newspaper reports during construction.
Photo on The New Franklin Viaduct Marker image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, undated
7. Photo on The New Franklin Viaduct Marker
[Caption reads] Close coordination with the MKT was necessary during design and construction. Courtesy: South Howard County Historical Society
Photo on The New Franklin Viaduct Marker image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, undated
8. Photo on The New Franklin Viaduct Marker
[Caption reads] New Franklin had almost zero unemployment during construction of the viaduct due to federal rules requiring use of local labor. Courtesy: South Howard County Historical Society
Photo on The New Franklin Viaduct Marker image. Click for full size.
By Randall Dawdy, MoDOT, undated
9. Photo on The New Franklin Viaduct Marker
[Caption reads] The viaduct was the south entrance to New Franklin for 70 years before it was removed.
Photo on The New Franklin Viaduct Marker image. Click for full size.
By Randall Dawdy, MoDOT, undated
10. Photo on The New Franklin Viaduct Marker
[Caption reads] Railings from the viaduct added a decorative element to the Katy Trail State Park. Concrete from the viaduct made 5000 tons of rock for state and local road projects.
Railing from New Franklin Viaduct near Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., April 11, 2011
11. Railing from New Franklin Viaduct near Marker
Symbol on New Franklin Viaduct Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., April 11, 2011
12. Symbol on New Franklin Viaduct Marker
Katy Trail State Park Milepost 188.3
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 7, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 423 times since then and 39 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12. submitted on September 7, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
Paid Advertisement