Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Topeka in Shawnee County, Kansas — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Kansas History

 
 
Kansas History Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., April 29, 2011
1. Kansas History Marker
Inscription.
The first Spanish explorers arrived in Kansas in 1541, followed by Lewis and Clark in 1804. Westward migration brought the first white settlers - government agents in 1808 and missionaries in 1825. Oil and gas were discovered in 1851. In 1854, Kansas became a territory with a population of 1,500 white people. On January 29, 1861, Kansas entered the Union as the 34th state with a constitution that prohibits slavery. In 1862, Kansas passed the Homestead Act. Homesteaders could claim 160 acres of land by living on it for five years.

Kansas is named for the Kansa tribe, whose name means People of the Wind. Famous for its farming, oil, aircraft industry, and modern cities, Kansas is a proud, forward-looking state.
 
Erected by Paul and Karma Aylward.
 
Location. 39° 2.863′ N, 95° 40.751′ W. Marker is in Topeka, Kansas, in Shawnee County. Touch for map. Marker is on the west grounds of the state Capitol, near SW Harrison Street and about 300 feet west of the SW entrance to the Capitol. Marker is at or near this postal address: 300 SW 10th Avenue, Topeka KS 66612, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Capitol Building (here, next to this marker); The Governor's Plaque
Kansas History Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., April 29, 2011
2. Kansas History Marker
State Capitol in background
(here, next to this marker); Kansas Children (here, next to this marker); The Kansa Tribe (here, next to this marker); Ad Astra Dedication Ceremony (here, next to this marker); Governor Landon's Acceptance (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Charles Curtis (about 300 feet away); Kansas Veterans' Walk (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Topeka.
 
Also see . . .
1. Kansapedia. (Submitted on September 10, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. State of Kansas Official Site. (Submitted on September 10, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. ExplorationNative AmericansPoliticsSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 10, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 366 times since then and 22 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on September 10, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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