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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Topeka in Shawnee County, Kansas — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

The Kansa Tribe

 
 
The Kansa Tribe Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., April 29, 2011
1. The Kansa Tribe Marker
Inscription.
The Kansa tribe inhabited the Kansas River Valley, where it was first encountered by European traders in the early 18th century. Centered around a number of villages, Kansa society possessed a clearly demarcated social structure and rigid gender roles. The economy centered on cultivation of corn, beans, pumpkins, and the summer and fall buffalo hunts. Trade manipulations by Europeans led to the impoverishment of the tribe in the early 19th century. In 1844, the federal government relocated the Kansa to the Upper Neosho Valley near Council Grove. However, white squatters took over this area in the 1850's. In 1863, Congress authorized removal of all Indians from Kansas. The Kansa tribe was relocated to Oklahoma in 1873.
 
Erected by Anderson Family Foundation.
 
Location. 39° 2.863′ N, 95° 40.751′ W. Marker is in Topeka, Kansas, in Shawnee County. Touch for map. Marker is on the west grounds of the state Capitol, near SW Harrison Street and about 300 feet west of the SW entrance to the Capitol. Marker is at or near this postal address: 300 SW 10th Avenue, Topeka KS 66612, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Capitol Building (here, next to this marker); Kansas History
The Kansa Tribe Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., April 29, 2011
2. The Kansa Tribe Marker
Kansas Capitol steps in background
(here, next to this marker); The Governor's Plaque (here, next to this marker); Kansas Children (here, next to this marker); Ad Astra Dedication Ceremony (here, next to this marker); Governor Landon's Acceptance (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Charles Curtis (about 300 feet away); Kansas Veterans' Walk (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Topeka.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Kaw (Kansa) Nation. (Submitted on September 10, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. Kansa Village. (Submitted on September 10, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. Kansa Tribe History. (Submitted on September 10, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Native Americans
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 10, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 398 times since then and 19 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on September 10, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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